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Fall 2016 Course Descriptions

101 - Introduction to Philosophy

101.001

Instructor: David Liakos
Time/s: MWF 10-10:50

This course will provide students with an introductory outline of the history and main problems of Western philosophy. By reading figures like Plato, Augustine, Descartes, Kant, Nietzsche, and others, we will learn about foundational philosophical questions such as whether we have a soul, what the fundamental nature of reality is, whether morality can have a foundation, what truth is, whether there is a God, how to define beauty, and so on. Students will learn how to read and understand difficult texts as well as how to write clearly about conceptually and analytically complex issues. Our goal is to improve our skills in reading and writing by bringing out the meaning and relevance of some of the main figures and texts of the philosophical tradition.

101.002

Instructor: Staff
Time/s: MW 5:30-6:45

Description forthcoming.

101.003

Instructor: Graham Bounds
Time/s: MWF 11-11:50

The ancient philosopher Aristotle once said that philosophy begins in wonder. While many disciplines are aimed at answering questions of interest mostly only for researchers in their fields, philosophy seeks to answer the big questions that in many ways define the human condition. What can we know and what can we not know? What are these things called minds, and how can I know that other people have them? What, if anything, is moral and immoral? Does God exist? Is there free will? What is the good life?                                                                

In this course, students will be introduced to some attempts by philosophers throughout history to answer these questions and others. The course will emphasize development of critical thinking skills, reading comprehension through close examination of complicated texts, and clear, thoughtful argumentative writing.

101.004

Instructor: Michael Candelaria
Time/s: MWF 12-12:50

Description forthcoming.

101.005

Instructor: Jim Bodington
Time/s: TR 2-3:15

In this course students will be introduced to several of the central questions of philosophy. We will see how our answers can and do shape our lives, and we will interrogate our all-too-often taken for granted beliefs. After an introduction to argumentation and philosophical methodology, we will look at issues of life and death, knowledge and perception, morality, and justice as they are addressed in the work of a number of great philosophers and involve ourselves in these perennial discussions. Figures we will encounter and engage with include Epicurus, Plato, Rene Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Karl Marx, Simone de Beauvoir, John Rawls, and Angela Davis.

101.006

Instructor: Kelly Becker
Time/s: TR 11-12:15

Can we know that God exists? If God exists, then why is there evil in the world?  What is the relation between mind and body?  I am not able to see or experience your thoughts, so how do I know that you have a mind?  Can science explain consciousness?  Can a computer be a mind?  What kind of thing is a person?  How am I the same person that ‘I’ was in my childhood?  (I don’t look or behave like that child.)  Does free will exist?  Is it compatible with a scientific view of the world?  Are there any grounds for morality? We’ll take this kind of topical approach to some of the most difficult and interesting questions in philosophy. 

Required Text TBA: Grades based on two papers (3-4 pp. and 4-5 pp.), two take-home exams, and pop quizzes. 

101.007

Instructor: Staff
Time/s: TR 3:30-4:45

According to tradition the term "philosophy" was coined about 530b.c. by the Greek mystic-mathematician Pythagoras (of the eponymous theorem).  It literally means "love of wisdom," as it is made up of these two words from the Greek (the mother tongue of philosophy).  As the love of, that is the pursuit of, wisdom, philosophy is, at the most fundamental level, about how one should live.  This is the approach taken in the lectures of the course.

 This is an introductory course in philosophy.  We will read selections from the tradition beginning with the classical Greek philosopher Plato and finishing up with a short book by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Kelly, two contemporary thinkers.  In between we will become acquainted with brief selections from Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Nietzsche, and Emerson.  This is a survey course, and the dedicated, hard-working student will gain a general idea of the tradition, and have a working understanding of a selection of representative texts from several philosophical disciplines (ethics, epistemology, metaphysics) and distinct historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary).

There will be regular short quizzes, weekly writing assignments, a mid-term and final exam.  Both the mid-term and final exam are short essay format.  The final exam is comprehensive.

You must purchase the following two books:

Plato's Republic, translated by CDC Reeve ($13 Hackett 0872207366 (Note: you must have this the first day of class and you must have this translation)

All things Shining, ($16 Free Press 141659616X)

All other readings will be provided in .pdf format on UNM Learn.

101.008

Instructor: Dimitry Shevchenko
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

This class aims to introduce students to some of the major issues in the history of philosophy. Does God exist? What is the self? What are right and wrong? What is the ideal kind of society? Do our senses provide reliable knowledge about reality, and if not, how can the nature of reality be known? What is the meaning of life?

Students will read the original texts of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Nietzsche, and other representatives of Western philosophical traditions, but will also become familiar with some of non-Western philosophers from Indian, Chinese, and other traditions such as Laozi, the Buddha, Vātsyāyana, Al-Ghazali etc. The students will also have an opportunity to critically assess and respond to these different philosophers - in class discussions and in writing assignments.   

Required Text:  Robert C. Solomon, Kathleen M. Higgins & Clancy Martin, Introducing Philosophy: A Text with Integrated Readings, 10th edition, Oxford University Press, 2012  

101.009

Instructor: Staff
Time/s: TR 6-7:15

According to tradition the term "philosophy" was coined about 530b.c. by the Greek mystic-mathematician Pythagoras (of the eponymous theorem).  It literally means "love of wisdom," as it is made up of these two words from the Greek (the mother tongue of philosophy).  As the love of, that is the pursuit of, wisdom, philosophy is, at the most fundamental level, about how one should live.  This is the approach taken in the lectures of the course.

 This is an introductory course in philosophy.  We will read selections from the tradition beginning with the classical Greek philosopher Plato and finishing up with a short book by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Kelly, two contemporary thinkers.  In between we will become acquainted with brief selections from Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, Leibniz, Nietzsche, and Emerson.  This is a survey course, and the dedicated, hard-working student will gain a general idea of the tradition, and have a working understanding of a selection of representative texts from several philosophical disciplines (ethics, epistemology, metaphysics) and distinct historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary).

There will be regular short quizzes, weekly writing assignments, a mid-term and final exam.  Both the mid-term and final exam are short essay format.  The final exam is comprehensive.

You must purchase the following two books:

Plato's Republic, translated by CDC Reeve ($13 Hackett 0872207366 (Note: you must have this the first day of class and you must have this translation)

All things Shining, ($16 Free Press 141659616X)

All other readings will be provided in .pdf format on UNM Learn.

101.011

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: TR 9:30-10:45

Learning  the Art of Close Reading

Proceeding historically through a few of the great works of Western philosophy, this course will introduce you to some deep and enduring philosophical questions, including:  What are the ultimate foundations of reality?  What is being?  What is love?  What does it mean to be human?  How should I live?  Can knowledge make me happy?  What is the good life?  What is the good death?  What is the relationship between being and time?  What is justice?  Which political arrangement is best?  What is enlightenment?  What effects are science and technology having on our world?  How should we understand the problem of nihilism or meaninglessness?  What does it mean to think?  What do autonomy, integrity, and authenticity mean and require?  What is freedom?  What are the necessary preconditions and consequences of freedom?  What is the meaning of life?  How have the answers to that question changed over the course of Western history?  What does it mean to read well, and how is that question connected to the good life?  The interconnected goals of the course include introducing you to the Western philosophical tradition, initiating you into the art of close philosophical reading, developing your skills in critical writing and argumentation, and, in all these ways, encouraging your thoughtful engagement with the world. Course requirements:  This course will require you to read, understand, and come to terms with a variety of challenging philosophical texts and issues.  You should take careful notes and always bring the relevant books with you to class (see below).  To facilitate your digestion of some difficult material, I shall require course attendance (which will be enforced through a variety of in-class pop quizzes worth 10% of your grade, of which we will drop/excuse your lowest score), two thoughtful, high-quality philosophy papers (worth 30% of your grade each), and an open-book (but no other notes), comprehensive final exam (worth 30% of your grade).  Your papers and final exam should demonstrate your active engagement with and strong grasp of the issues presented and discussed in class.  (Paper topics will be handed out several weeks before the papers are due; I strongly encourage you to discuss your ideas with me or the TAs during our office hours.)  Be sure to TURN YOUR PAPERS IN ON TIME; late papers will be marked down 1 grade per day late (from A to B, B to C, etc.).  No incompletes (except in unavoidable circumstances beyond your control, with proper documentation).  Make sure to keep an extra copy of your papers.  Cheating, talking in class, coming in late, reading the newspaper, surfing the internet, emailing, texting, sleeping during class, and other ridiculously uncollegial behavior is distracting to your colleagues and disrespectful to me, and such incivilities will not be tolerated.  (If you must come late on a particular day then enter the class quietly by the back door and sit in the nearest open seat; after class you must explain to one of the TAs why you had to be late.)  All phones, tablets, laptops, and other screens must be turned off and stowed away during class.  (If you have an urgent matter that requires you to be on call on a particular day you must tell me that ahead of time and sit in the back row near the door.)  Students who repeatedly break any of these rules should expect to be disenrolled.  If you have any questions please feel free to ask them. 

101.012 (2H)

Instructor: Lisa Gerber
Time/s: ONLINE

(2H Eight Weeks)

This course is an exploration of some of the basic questions in philosophy such as what is reality, what is self, what is the connection between mind and body, whether are we free, and what is the nature of right and wrong. 

 Robert C. Solomon, Introducing Philosophy

Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Various essays and lectures on Learn

Film: The Matrix

101.015

Instructor: Carolyn Thomas
Time/s: ONLINE

This completely online section of “Introduction to Philosophy” will introduce you philosophic wonder, thought, and thinking. We’ll work to read, think, question, discuss, and write about persistent philosophical questions, such as those about life's meaning, the existence of God, human being, emotion, justice, technology, what’s good, and the philosophic life itself. Required weekly work includes readings, discussion thread posts, quizzes, one or two essays, midterm and final exam. Coursework will be due twice each week, at midnight on Thursday and Sunday nights. You must have reliable Internet access, but no other special equipment is required.

101.656 (FLC)

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: TR 9:30-10:45

(FLC)

Learning  the Art of Close Reading

Proceeding historically through a few of the great works of Western philosophy, this course will introduce you to some deep and enduring philosophical questions, including:  What are the ultimate foundations of reality?  What is being?  What is love?  What does it mean to be human?  How should I live?  Can knowledge make me happy?  What is the good life?  What is the good death?  What is the relationship between being and time?  What is justice?  Which political arrangement is best?  What is enlightenment?  What effects are science and technology having on our world?  How should we understand the problem of nihilism or meaninglessness?  What does it mean to think?  What do autonomy, integrity, and authenticity mean and require?  What is freedom?  What are the necessary preconditions and consequences of freedom?  What is the meaning of life?  How have the answers to that question changed over the course of Western history?  What does it mean to read well, and how is that question connected to the good life?  The interconnected goals of the course include introducing you to the Western philosophical tradition, initiating you into the art of close philosophical reading, developing your skills in critical writing and argumentation, and, in all these ways, encouraging your thoughtful engagement with the world. Course requirements:  This course will require you to read, understand, and come to terms with a variety of challenging philosophical texts and issues.  You should take careful notes and always bring the relevant books with you to class (see below).  To facilitate your digestion of some difficult material, I shall require course attendance (which will be enforced through a variety of in-class pop quizzes worth 10% of your grade, of which we will drop/excuse your lowest score), two thoughtful, high-quality philosophy papers (worth 30% of your grade each), and an open-book (but no other notes), comprehensive final exam (worth 30% of your grade).  Your papers and final exam should demonstrate your active engagement with and strong grasp of the issues presented and discussed in class.  (Paper topics will be handed out several weeks before the papers are due; I strongly encourage you to discuss your ideas with me or the TAs during our office hours.)  Be sure to TURN YOUR PAPERS IN ON TIME; late papers will be marked down 1 grade per day late (from A to B, B to C, etc.).  No incompletes (except in unavoidable circumstances beyond your control, with proper documentation).  Make sure to keep an extra copy of your papers.  Cheating, talking in class, coming in late, reading the newspaper, surfing the internet, emailing, texting, sleeping during class, and other ridiculously uncollegial behavior is distracting to your colleagues and disrespectful to me, and such incivilities will not be tolerated.  (If you must come late on a particular day then enter the class quietly by the back door and sit in the nearest open seat; after class you must explain to one of the TAs why you had to be late.)  All phones, tablets, laptops, and other screens must be turned off and stowed away during class.  (If you have an urgent matter that requires you to be on call on a particular day you must tell me that ahead of time and sit in the back row near the door.)  Students who repeatedly break any of these rules should expect to be disenrolled.  If you have any questions please feel free to ask them. 

156 - Reasoning & Critical Thinking

156.001

Instructor: Elly Van Mil
Time/s: MW 5:30-6:45

In this course, students will learn to critically assess claims and arguments, to distinguish bad from good arguments using the basic elements of critical thinking, and to learn skills needed to analyze others’ arguments and to create one’s own.  The course will cover essential elements of deductive and inductive reasoning, and assessment skills and tools, including fallacies and irrational techniques of persuasion, needed to critically assess arguments. The second half of the course emphasizes learning the distinct reasoning skills used in science and morality, and to critique contemporary media content. 

Text and Other Materials:

Required:   W. Huges, J. Lavery, and K. Doran, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills. 7th Edition, 2015. Broadview Press.

Additional Materials posted on UNM Learn.  

156.002

Instructor: Marcel Lebow
Time/s: TR 9:30-10:45

What does it mean to reason well? We possess the ability to reason, to argue, and to analyze, but this does not mean we reason, argue, and analyze properly and consistently. In this course we will refine these tools of thought and develop our critical thinking skills. We will study the formal structures of argumentation and learn to identify the quality of arguments. Additionally, through a close examination of our language, we will see what it takes to convey our thoughts clearly and accurately.

In the second half of this course, we will apply these skills through a close reading and critical assessment of Thomas Ligotti's Conspiracy Against the Human Race. Ligotti, a pessimist and nihilist, presents several compelling arguments against a claim most of us take for granted: "Being alive is all right." By virtue of being alive ourselves we cannot help but affirm our existence, and yet such an affirmation is thoroughly challenged by Ligotti. By engaging with this text, we will be forced to think critically about likely our most cherished and unthought belief.

156.003

Instructor: Mariah Partida
Time/s: MWF 10-10:50

This course will take up the following questions, among others: How do we determine whether an argument is good or bad, strong or weak? How can we apply argument analysis to our everyday lives? In the first half of the course, we will familiarize ourselves with three key aspects of argument analysis: First, what is an argument? What are the claims being made by that argument? What is the conclusion? Next, do the supporting claims actually give us good reason to think the conclusion is true? Finally, are the supporting claims true, or at least plausible? In the second half of the course, we will apply our newfound argument-analysis skills to various texts. In doing so, we will both evaluate the reasoning of the arguments being made by these authors and construct written responses to those arguments. Disclaimer: Keep in mind that, although we will focus on formal logic in a sense, this is not a symbolic logic class.

Required Text:  Pine, Ronald C. Essential Logic: Basic Reasoning Skills for the Twenty-First Century (1st edition).

Recommended Text: Strunk, W. & White, E.B. Elements of Style (4th edition).

156.004

Instructor: Idris Robinson
Time/s: TR 11-12:15

In the first half of the course, students will learn to identify, construct, and critically assess arguments. Through a rigorous examination of the basic principles of reason, students will come to acquire the analytic skills necessary to both develop and evaluate the quality of an argument. The second half of the semester will be devoted to applying these skills in response to Alain Badiou’s contemporary rendition of Plato’s Republic. In Badiou’s hyper-translation, timeless themes, such as truth, justice, and knowledge, are refashioned in a colorful, modern garb: present-day allusions to iPods, soft-drinks, and sports-cars replace all of the Republic’s outdated ancient Greek references; and even Plato’s famous “cave allegory” is converted into a movie theater. While these aspects of Badiou’s version of the classic dialogue undoubtedly make it an enjoyable read, critical analysis and reasoning will allow us to determine whether Plato’s arguments can stand the test of time.

Texts: (1) William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, & Katheryn Doran, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills (6th edition); (2) Alain Badiou, Plato’s Republic: A Dialogue in 16 Chapters.

156.005

Instructor: Staff
Time/s: TR 3:30-4:45

Description forthcoming.

156.006

Instructor: Krupa Patel
Time/s: TR 2-3:15

This course is designed to provide concepts and methods for developing, analyzing, and critically evaluating arguments.  We will study clarity and precision in reasoning, the role of definitions, informal fallacies, and inductive and deductive arguments.  Principles for determining the validity of deductive arguments and the strength of inductive arguments will be developed.  We will study these principles in the context of many issues involving culture, class, and gender.  The course will emphasize the application of reasoning skills in reading, writing, and speaking.

 Required Texts: Critical Thinking, An Introduction to the Basic Skills (7th Edition), by William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, Katheryn Doran (Broadview Press).   Elements of Style (4th Edition), by William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White, (Pearson)

156.009

Instructor: James Bodington
Time/s: TR 8-9:15

This course will introduce students to the fundamental skills of critical thinking and argument analysis, as well as the application of these skills via critical engagement with important contemporary social and political issues. The course begins with an exploration of the tools and concepts of informal logic and linguistic analysis. We will investigate, among other things, theories of meaning, the structures of arguments, various fallacies, criteria for evaluating arguments, and the differences between different types of reasoning (how, for instance, is a moral argument different from a scientific argument?). In the second half of the course we will apply these skills by engaging with contemporary social and political issues. We will cover and argumentatively respond to texts that address questions of economic and social justice (How should resources be distributed? What is the most just form of government? Is political violence ever justified?), and examine media coverage of current political issues and the 2016 US elections. 

156.010

Instructor: Simon Walker
Time/s: MWF 11-11:50

Clear thought, logical argumentation and the ability to articulate ourselves with precision are essential for developing a deeper relationship to the social world that we are imbedded in.  Through developing these abilities we learn to present ourselves clearly both in written and spoken form, as these are skills that are pertinent to all aspects of life.  

This course will introduce the main aspects of critical thought.  We will start by looking the basic concepts of argumentation and our use of language and grammar. 

After this, we will apply these skills in an analysis of one of the most important and influential philosophy books ever written: Plato’s Republic.  Alongside this we will ask how ideas in this text can be applied to problems in our present world.

By the end of the class students will have a basic knowledge of augmentative structures and also a firm grasp of how to express themselves clearly.  They will also be able to apply these skills to problems they encounter in their everyday lives.

Required texts: (1) William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, & Katheryn Doran, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills (6th or 7th edition). (2) Plato & Robin Waterfield (trans), Republic.  Oxford World’s Classic. (3)  Strunk, W. & White, E.B. Elements of Style (4th edition) 

156.011 (1H)

Instructor: Lisa Gerber
Time/s: ONLINE

**First Half**    (1H)

Most intellectual endeavors involve argumentation. From short letters to the editor to complex philosophical essays, from every day discussions to legal debates, argues are constantly created and invoked to support or criticize points of view. The purpose of the course is to help you learn how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments.

The course material is organized into two sections. In the first section, we will do an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools that are needed for analyzing arguments. The second section is an in-depth examination of philosophical essays on cloning and genetic engineering.

Required texts:  1.  Strunk and White, Elements of Style   2.  Morrow and Weston, A Workbook for Arguments  3.  Handouts and Essays posted on Learn

156.611 (FLC)

Instructor: Staff
Time/s: TR 5-6:15

Description forthcoming.

156.656 (FLC)

Instructor: Krupa Patel
Time/s: TR 11-12:15

This course is designed to provide concepts and methods for developing, analyzing, and critically evaluating arguments.  We will study clarity and precision in reasoning, the role of definitions, informal fallacies, and inductive and deductive arguments.  Principles for determining the validity of deductive arguments and the strength of inductive arguments will be developed.  We will study these principles in the context of many issues involving culture, class, and gender.  The course will emphasize the application of reasoning skills in reading, writing, and speaking.

 Required Text: Critical Thinking, An Introduction to the Basic Skills (7th Edition), by William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, Katheryn Doran (Broadview Press)

 Elements of Style(4th Edition), by William Strunk, Jr. and E.B. White, (Pearson)

201 - Greek Thought

201.001 (2H)

Instructor: John Taber
Time/s: TR 17-1930 (5-7:30)

 Second Half course.  Begins 10/17/16

A survey of some of the themes of ancient Greek culture that have influenced the development of Western civilization. We shall read texts of Sophocles (the Oedipus cycle), Homer (the Iliad), Plato (Apology, Protagoras, Meno, Symposium), and Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics, Metaphysics). Study questions on the readings will be due weekly; reflection papers on films, when shown, will also be assigned. Final take-home exam.

NOTE: This is an eight-week course that will begin after Fall Break. 

201.002

Instructor: Joachim Oberst
Time/s: MWF 12-12:50

In this course we undertake a radical transition in historical perspective (of some 2000 to 2600 years) back to the foundations of Western Philosophy. Students are expected to engage in the discovery and exploration of ancient texts whose language, composition, style and philosophical substance will at first contact appear unusual and even strange. In many cases the text will look like an incomplete puzzle (which in fact they often are). Making sense of these texts will take some devotion on the part of the student. Through serious study and consultation of the texts, their manifold messages will become apparent. It is the goal of this course to introduce students to the original sources of their own thinking and to discover the extent to which their own thinking is indebted to and imbedded in ancient Greek thought. 

After a quick glance at Hesiod’s mythological worldview, we will literally start with the "first philosophers" known as the "Presocratics" and look at some of the fragments of their rich works that have survived more than two millennia. We will then move to the literary works of Plato and read a selection of his earlier and middle dialogues (on death and love). We shall see how important aspects of these ideas find exploration on the Greek stage as we look at some plays by Aristophanes (comedy) and Euripides (tragedy). In Aristotle we will discover an encyclopedic mind who devoted his philosophical research to all aspects of (human) life. We will look at selections of his philosophical lectures on nature, language, physics and metaphysics. To conclude the course we will take a brief excursion into the Hellenistic world where we shall encounter the Epicureans, the Stoics, the Cynics and the Skeptics with their theological, epistemological and ethical worldviews. 

There is no prerequisite to this course. In addition to offering stimulation for intellectual development and personal enrichment through the philological treatment of texts, the course will prepare students to participate in other courses in philosophy and the humanities at large, especially in classics and the history of philosophy. The course can also be illuminating for students of the natural sciences.

Requirements

Students who want to pass the course are asked to write two 5-page papers on two different assigned questions (30% each) and one film review (30%). Final evaluation will be based on the written work as well as on class participation and class attendance (10%).  

202 - Descartes to Kant

202.001

Instructor: Adrian Johnston
Time/s: MWF 10-10:50

In the seventeenth century, René Descartes, the founding figure of modern philosophy (a period in the history of philosophy running from the 1600's to the beginning of the twentieth century), initiated a revolutionary reorientation of Western philosophy by centering intellectual attention on the individual human subject as a knowing being.  Descartes’s work launched a series of discussions about how we know what we claim to know about the fundamental nature of reality, discussions that continue up through the present.  This course will focus on issues pertaining to epistemology (i.e., that part of philosophy concerned with constructing a theory of knowledge) and ontology (i.e., that part of philosophy concerned with constructing a theory of being) in the modern period, starting with Descartes and concluding with Immanuel Kant (late eighteenth century).  In particular, we will occupy ourselves with an exploration of, first, the distinction between the two basic epistemological orientations in modern philosophy, namely, rationalism and empiricism (as well as Kant’s attempted resolution of these opposed orientations), and, second, the ontological alternatives between monism and dualism, nominalism and metaphysical realism, and materialism and idealism.  Additionally, a series of other related questions and problems will be explored, such as:  the relation between mind and body, the essence of personal identity, the role of science as a means of access to reality, and various conceptions of truth.  The authors from this period we will read are:  Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Arnauld, Pascal, Spinoza, Leibniz, Boyle, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. 

202.002

Instructor: Barbara Hannan
Time/s: TR 11-12:15

This course examines Western philosophy during the Early Modern period, with an emphasis on metaphysics and epistemology.  Philosophers studied include Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. 

Text:  Ariew and Watkins, Modern Philosophy: An Anthology of Primary Sources, 2nd edition (Hackett). 

211 - Greek Philosophy

211.001

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: MWF 10-10:50

Philosophy in the western tradition begins with the ancient Greeks, and there is no better introduction to philosophy than to study their thought and writing.  In this course, we will attempt to develop an original path of questioning in critical dialogue with the Greeks, with the aim of locating ourselves and the problems of contemporary life more radically within the problematics that they already pursued.   Issues to be discussed include, among others: the nature of thought, reason and the soul; the structure of time and space; language, meaning, and truth; being, change and becoming; ethics and the good; life and death.   Readings are from various Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus.  Course requirements: weekly short reading responses, three short tests (open book, in class) and final examination. 

241 - Topics: Gender Theory

241.001 - Gender Theory

Instructor: 
Time/s: Canceled

Canceled.

245 - Professional Ethics

245.005

Instructor: Carolyn Thomas
Time/s: ONLINE

This completely online course explores the challenging complexity of ethical issues in professional life. What distinguishes a profession from other jobs not considered to be professions? Is there more to professional practice or professionalism than following rules or a professional code? Do ‘professional’ demands and responsibilities override ‘normal’ or private moral duties, e.g. a lawyer keeping a murderer’s confidence, a nurse lying to ease a patient’s emotional distress, an advertiser obscuring a product’s flaws to win a corporate account, or a company engineer disregarding his discovery of a structural flaw? We’ll work to develop awareness of ethical concerns in a range of professions and  to develop awareness of ethical theories, assumptions (including your own), and arguments in addressing ethical concerns in specific case studies. And we’ll aim to expand our individual senses of right, fairness, and compassion in our own professional (or future professional) roles.  Required weekly work includes readings, discussion thread posts, quizzes, one or two essays, midterm and final exam. Coursework will be due twice each week, at midnight on Thursday and Sunday nights. You must have reliable Internet access, but no other special equipment is required.

336 - Chinese Philosophy

336.001

Instructor: Emily McRae
Time/s: TR 9:30-10:45

This course surveys Chinese philosophy, with emphasis on the early (pre-Qin) period. We will examine early Chinese philosophical schools, including Confucianism, Daoism, Mohism and Legalism. Themes will includes early Chinese understandings of human nature, virtue and goodness, sagehood, attitudes toward death and dying, political philosophy, and theories of knowledge.  

341 - Topics in Philosophy

341.002 - Aldo Leopold & Land Ethics

Instructor: Lisa Gerber
Time/s: MWF 12-12:50

Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) was a philosopher, forester, ecologist, and conservationist. In the Sand County Almanac, he developed the land ethic that asks us to expand our moral community to include, plants, animals, and the land. The principle of the land ethic states: “Examine each question in terms of what is ethically and aesthetically right, as well as what is economically expedient. A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise." This course explores his philosophy and its relevance to today’s environmental issues.

 Required Texts:   Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac and Sketches Here and There.     Curt Meine, Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work.   David E. Brown and Neil B. Carmony, eds, Aldo Leopold’s Southwest.  J. Baird Callicott, Companion to A Sand County Almanac.   Flader and Callicott, edsThe River of the Mother of God and Other Essays.  Various electronic essays on Learn

341.004 - Feminist Philosophy

Instructor: Emily McRae
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

This course is an exploration of some of the major trends in historical and contemporary feminist philosophy. We will examine and analyze such concepts as patriarchy, masculine/feminine, oppression, sexism and feminism. We will explore issues of historical and contemporary significance for women, including the phenomenology of femininity and the psychology of oppression, language and self-expression, justice in the workplace and in the family, domestic violence, rape, marriage and motherhood, and multicultural and global feminisms.  

352 - Theory of Knowledge

352.001

Instructor: Allan Hazlett
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

This course provides an introduction to epistemology – the philosophical study of knowledge, justified belief, and intellectual virtue – with an emphasis on questions about how we ought to engage intellectually with other people.  A recurring theme will be the phenomenon of testimonial belief – believing what other people tell you – and questions about its social and political value.  Topics will include the nature and value of knowledge, free speech, religious disagreement, expertise, moral authority, prejudice and credibility, gossip and rumor, urban legends, and conspiracy theories.  We will read works by Robert Nozick, A.J. Ayer, J.S. Mill, Alvin Goldman, G.E.M. Anscombe, Miranda Fricker, C.A.J. Coady, and others.  

356 - Symbolic Logic

356.001

Instructor: Barbara Hannan
Time/s: TR 14-1540 (2-3:40)

In this course we will learn two formal languages, SL (sentential logic) and PL (predicate logic).  These formal languages enable us to symbolize natural language sentences and arguments, and to prove that the symbolized sentences and arguments have various interesting logical properties, such as logical truth, logical falsehood, deductive validity, and so forth.  Techniques covered include semantic methods such as truth-tables and truth-trees, and syntactic methods such as derivation-rule systems for both sentential and predicate logic. 

 Text:  Bergmann, Moor, and Nelson, The Logic Book, 6th edition (McGraw-Hill).

 

358 - Ethical Theory

358.001

Instructor: Ann Murphy
Time/s: MWF 8-8:50

This course introduces the student to the main moral frameworks in normative ethics:  utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics, via an analysis of texts by John Stuart Mill, Immanuel Kant, and Aristotle. We will also engage more contemporary literature that situates itself both critically and sympathetically in relation to these foundational historical texts.  While the main texts under examination will be largely historical, one guiding aim of the course is to understand the contemporary relevance of these authors through the application of their theories to topics such as free speech, friendship, forgiveness, truth-telling, and punishment.  The course aims to cultivate an awareness of the differences between the major theoretical paradigms in normative ethics, as well as an attunement to the contemporary relevance of these theories. 

358.002

Instructor: Anne Baril
Time/s: MWF 14-1450 (2-2:50)

This course introduces the student to a variety of philosophical approaches to living morally, including: the utilitarian’s emphasis on happiness and the importance of attending to the consequences of our actions; Immanuel Kant’s view, according to which the unqualified goodness of a will determined by the moral law is central; and the ancient idea of eudaimonia as the entry point for ethical reflection.  We will read philosophical works by Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Stuart Mill, and Immanuel Kant, as well as commentary by contemporary advocates, and critics, of their ideas.  These philosophers offer us not only differing answers to moral questions; they offer us different questions, entirely different moral orientations. Though the subject matter of the course is largely historical, the ultimate aim of the course is not to offer a history, but to enable the student to fully occupy and explore these different orientations, so that he or she is in an improved position to answer, for him or herself, the question “how should I live?”

 Upon successful completion of the course, students will have:

  • Familiarity with some of the most important figures, positions, and central questions in Western moral philosophy.

  • Enhanced ability to reason morally-- to understand and analyze moral arguments and positions, to identify what makes for a good or bad argument, and to formulate good, well-reasoned arguments.

  • Enhanced ability to discuss moral issues, both in writing and in verbal discussion.

 Course Materials

 iClicker

Moral Theory: An Introductionby Mark Timmons.

Other readings will be posted to Blackboard (“UNM Learn”):  learn.unm.edu

365 - Philosophy of Religion

365.001

Instructor: Joachim Oberst
Time/s: W 1600-1830 (4-6:30)

In this seminar we will examine conceptions of the divine that have marked the Western tradition. We will use a historical and exegetical approach. Starting with the Greeks we will look at theologians, philosophers, mystics as well as secular free thinkers (among them atheists), who have poured their visions (and rejections) of the divine into religious, philosophical and political proclamations. As will become apparent, an integral part of the varying conceptions of the divine are the corresponding human self-conceptions. Any conception of God(s) is also a reflection of human being. Among the Greeks we shall consult Hesiod, the Presocratics, Plato and Aristotle; among the Judeo-Christians the Prophets, Job, the Apostle Paul, and Augustine; among the atheists and anti-Christians, Friedrich Nietzsche, Ludwig Feuerbach, Bertrand Russell and Jean-Paul Sartre. Students are given the option to supplement their reading with works by Rationalists like Descartes, Voltaire and Kant as well as religious existentialists such as Søren Kierkegaard and spiritual free thinkers such as Martin Heidegger. That the religious conception of God can, does, and perhaps must speak with political force can be seen in the American tradition (Martin Luther King, Frederick Douglass, Malcolm X) as well as in philosophical atheists like Karl Marx. The purpose of these comparisons is not to befriend one conception over another, but to realize that any confining conception of the divine may end up in (religious) idolatry or (philosophical and political) ideology. The goal then of this seminar is to discover and develop the intellectual freedom necessary to confront any conception of the divine with honesty and integrity, which, as we will see, can then be coupled with the courage for critical self-examination. 

This course is taught as a seminar. The focus of a seminar is class discussion where much of the learning and understanding is done. Essential to success in the classroom are mutual respect, attentiveness, openness, willingness to speak one’s mind and sentiment, and the courage to formulate questions and comments within the rules of civilized and constructive dialogue.  

368 - Biomedical Ethics

368.001

Instructor: Anne Baril
Time/s: MWF 1-1:50

Course aims

This course offers an introduction to medical ethics from a philosophical perspective.  Upon successful completion of the course, students will have achieved the following interrelated goals: 

  • Enhanced ability to understand and analyze ethical arguments and positions, to identify what makes for a good or bad argument, and to formulate good, well-reasoned arguments, especially in the context of health care.

  • Enhanced ability to discuss ethical issues, both in writing and in verbal discussion, especially in the context of health care.

  • Familiarity with some of the most important figures, positions, and central questions in Western ethical philosophy. 

Course materials

Course materials are available on Blackboard: learn.unm.edu

410 - Kant

410.001

Instructor: Mary Domski
Time/s: T 16-1830 (4-6:30)

Our primary goal in this class is to complete a careful reading of Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (commonly referred to as the First Critique) and examine the so-called critical project that Kant sets out in this work.  In the course of our examination, we’ll pay special attention to how Kant attempts both to respond to problems stemming from Humean skepticism and to accommodate key elements of Newtonian physics.  We will also refer to some works Kant published between 1781 and 1787 to get a sense of why Kant chose to change, add, and delete portions of the first (1781) edition Critique before the second (1787) edition appeared in print. Students enrolled in this class will be required to complete several short writing assignments as well as three longer writing assignments. 

438 - Indian Buddhist Philosophy

438.001

Instructor: John Taber
Time/s: M 4-6:30

This course will examine some of the basic teachings of the Buddha and how they were interpreted by later Buddhist thinkers and eventually incorporated into the two great philosophical systems of Mahāyāna Buddhism: Madhyamaka and Yogācāra. Readings will include selected suttas (discourses) from the Theravāda canon, the Diamond Sūtra, Vimalakīrtinirdeśa Sūtra, Lotus Sūtra, Mūlamadhyamakakārikā (Nāgārjuna), Viṃśikā (Vasubandhu), and Pramāṇavārttika (Dharmakīrti). Assignments: a mid-term exam and a final paper.

Prerequisite: Some familiarity with Western philosophy and philosophical methodology will be helpful. 

441 - Topics in Philosophy: Love, Art, Technology

441.001 - Love, Art, Technology

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: TR 1230-1345 (12:30-1:45)

Love, Art, and Technology:  Philosophical Explorations of Meaning

How is technology transforming our understanding of ourselves, each other, and our world?  What drives the spread of technology ever outward, across the globe, and inward, into the innermost recesses of our lives?  What does it mean to understand the Western tradition of philosophical metaphysics as “ontotheology”?  How does learning to recognize ontotheology as the core of technologization help us resist the growing meaningless of technological nihilism?  How does that help us learn to use even technologies themselves to resist and transcend the nihilistic effects of global technologization?  In what ways do the phenomena of love and art stand against such nihilistic technologization?  And in what ways do art and love too get caught up in technology’s optimization imperative, the endless demand that we “Get the most for the least,” increasingly treating everything, including ourselves, as meaningless resources awaiting optimization?   In what ways has our modern thinking of love remained complicit with phallogocentrism, as well as with sex, gender, and other oppression?   In what ways has art been reduced to something of merely aesthetic interest, a stimulating distraction rather than a crucial aspect of all human being?  How should we move toward thinking love and art as we struggle toward a more meaningful, postmodern future?  Those are some of the questions we will explore in this course.  We will begin with Marcuse’s classic text from the heart of the (would-be) love revolution of the 1960s, then turn to consider some of the most important contemporary work on these issues.  Course requirements:  To facilitate your creative engagement with some difficult texts, course attendance will be required, along with two high-quality philosophical papers. 

Required texts:  1).  Marcuse, Eros and Civilization; 2). Thomson, Heidegger, Art, and Postmodernity; 3). Nancy, God, Justice, Love, Beauty:  Four Little Dialogues; 4). Badiou, In Praise of Love; 4).  Frankfurt, The Reasons of Love; 5). Irigaray, The Way of Love; and 7). Baudrillard, The Vital Illusion.  

454 - Seminar: Social Epistemology of Honesty

454.001 - Social Epistemology of Honesty

Instructor: Allan Hazlett
Time/s: R 16-1830 (4-6:30)

Honesty is typically prized by philosophers: Diogenes the Cynic roamed Athens “looking for an honest man,” Socrates argued that a philosopher “must never willingly tolerate falsehood in any form,” Kant insisted that telling the truth “is the formal duty of man to everyone, however great the disadvantage that may arise therefrom,” Adam Smith wrote that “[t]o tell a man that he lies, is of all affronts the most mortal,” and Nietzsche describes “truthfulness” (among other forms of virtue) as “our noble and dangerous luxury.”  This seminar will investigate whether and to what extent this attitude, or anything like it, is reasonable.  Our discussion will divide roughly into coverage of five topics: the epistemology of testimony, the value of truth, the nature and badness of lying, the nature and norms of assertion, and species of falsehood other than lying (such as conspiracy theories, urban legends, and bullshit).  Although we will engage with certain historical texts, and will hope to trace the genealogy of the love of honesty, our ultimate goal will be to make progress towards answering the non-historical, non-genealogical question of whether and to what extent honesty deserves to be prized. 

Readings will primarily be from contemporary social epistemology and philosophy of language, including work by C.A.J. Coady, Elizabeth Fricker, Jennifer Saul, Timothy Williamson, Ishani Maitra, and Harry Frankfurt. 

Students will need a copy of Bernard Williams, Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy (Cambridge University Press, 2002); all else will be made available electronically.   

455 - Philosophy of Mind

455.001

Instructor: Kelly Becker
Time/s: TR 14-1515 (2-3:15)

Have you ever heard the expression, “It’s mind over matter”?  Is it meant to imply that the mind is not a material thing?  Descartes famously argued that matter and mind are distinct substances—the mind being neither material nor spatial.  But surely your mind, through thinking, causes your body to do things, like eat food because you desire it, avoid dark alleys because you’re afraid, or shake someone’s hand because you believe that it will seal the agreement.  How could a nonmaterial thing cause a bodily entity to do anything at all?  This sort of question will launch us into an exploration of the mind—what it is (maybe it just is the brain, but be warned, solutions in philosophy don’t come that easy!), what kinds of states it has and events it undergoes, how it relates to (the rest of) one’s body and to other material bodies, whether a computer could have or be one, and whether consciousness can be understood in material terms.  Text TBA.  Grades will be based on two papers (midterm 25% and final 35%) and two relatively short take-home exams (20% each).   

457 - Seminar: Plato's Republic

457.001 - Plato's Republic

Instructor: John Bussanich
Time/s: TR 2-3:15

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth study of Plato's Republic, one of the masterworks of Western philosophy. Most philosophy students have read this text, but understanding it is another matter. The text is remarkably dense and engages virtually ever theme and problem in Plato’s metaphysics, politics, cosmology, psychology, ethics, and aesthetics. In conjunction with our reading and critical discussion of the entire text of the Republic, we shall also read selections from other major Platonic dialogues that bear on individual topics in the Republic. 

Because this is an advanced seminar, students should be prepared to read and critically respond to weekly assignments of the secondary literature on Plato and the Republic. Course participants should acquire Plato Complete Works, ed. John Cooper, Hackett Publishing. 

469 - Seminar: Subjectivity & Presence (Theory of the Non-Subject II)

469.001 - Subjectivity & Presence (Theory of the Non-Subject II)

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: M 17-1930 (5-7:30)

 This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence with the overall aim of critically interrogating a variety of contemporary discourses, of both “analytic” and “continental” philosophy, which assume or affirm the substantial existence of a subject of consciousness or freedom.     We will consider these discourses drawing on phenomenological, formal, and critical approaches and work to sketch an alternative picture according to which the various phenomena traditionally treated under the heading of subjectivity can be understood, without denying or eliminating these phenomena themselves, in other terms (for instance linguistic, ontological, formal or meta-formal ones).[1]  

 This semester, we will consider the development of thematic and critical discourses of the subject within twentieth-century “continental” philosophy along two somewhat parallel and partially overlapping trajectories.  In the first of these, we will consider (through texts by Husserl, Sartre, Heidegger, and Derrida) the phenomenological development of the questions of subjectivity, consciousness, and freedom along the guideline of the question of the subject’s (traditionally essential and definitive) presence to (it)self.  We shall interrogate the traditional value of this self-presence while working simultaneously toward a phenomenologically and ontologically clarified understanding of the underlying phenomenon of presence (as it might be determined formally, temporally, and existentially).  In the second trajectory, passing through midcentury “structuralism,” we will consider the development of formal approaches to subjectivity and its foundations in relation to logical and linguistic structure.  Here we will read texts by Frege, Lacan, Miller, Badiou, and Deleuze in the light of formal results such as those of Cantor, Tarski, Russell, and Gödel.[2]   In each case, we will consider what defines or articulates a “subject position,” or the self-relation it presupposes, within or in relation to the broader formal and relational structures of language, reflexivity, identity, difference, and the world as such. By the end of the course, we shall thus hope to be in a position not only to understand the formal and phenomenological determinants of the traditional ontology of the subject but also to assay, on this basis, the space of critical alternatives to it that remain open for us today. 


 



[1] NB: The first part of the course, “Language and Consciousness” (spring 2016) considered “analytic” approaches to the problems raised here.  No material from the first semester course will be presupposed in the second and students should feel free to enroll even if they were not in the first semester course. 

[2] All formal results will be introduced and explained in an accessible and non-technical manner. 

510 - Kant

510.001

Instructor: Mary Domski
Time/s: T 16-1830 (4-6:30)

Our primary goal in this class is to complete a careful reading of Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (commonly referred to as the First Critique) and examine the so-called critical project that Kant sets out in this work.  In the course of our examination, we’ll pay special attention to how Kant attempts both to respond to problems stemming from Humean skepticism and to accommodate key elements of Newtonian physics.  We will also refer to some works Kant published between 1781 and 1787 to get a sense of why Kant chose to change, add, and delete portions of the first (1781) edition Critique before the second (1787) edition appeared in print. Students enrolled in this class will be required to complete several short writing assignments as well as three longer writing assignments. 

554 - Seminar: Social Epistemology of Honesty

554.001

Instructor: Allan Hazlett
Time/s: R 16-1830 (4-6:30)

Honesty is typically prized by philosophers: Diogenes the Cynic roamed Athens “looking for an honest man,” Socrates argued that a philosopher “must never willingly tolerate falsehood in any form,” Kant insisted that telling the truth “is the formal duty of man to everyone, however great the disadvantage that may arise therefrom,” Adam Smith wrote that “[t]o tell a man that he lies, is of all affronts the most mortal,” and Nietzsche describes “truthfulness” (among other forms of virtue) as “our noble and dangerous luxury.”  This seminar will investigate whether and to what extent this attitude, or anything like it, is reasonable.  Our discussion will divide roughly into coverage of five topics: the epistemology of testimony, the value of truth, the nature and badness of lying, the nature and norms of assertion, and species of falsehood other than lying (such as conspiracy theories, urban legends, and bullshit).  Although we will engage with certain historical texts, and will hope to trace the genealogy of the love of honesty, our ultimate goal will be to make progress towards answering the non-historical, non-genealogical question of whether and to what extent honesty deserves to be prized.  Readings will primarily be from contemporary social epistemology and philosophy of language, including work by C.A.J. Coady, Elizabeth Fricker, Jennifer Saul, Timothy Williamson, Ishani Maitra, and Harry Frankfurt.  Students will need a copy of Bernard Williams, Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy (Cambridge University Press, 2002); all else will be made available electronically.   

557 - Seminar: Plato's Republic

557.001 - Plato's Republic

Instructor: John Bussanich
Time/s: TR 2-3:15

This course is a comprehensive, in-depth study of Plato's Republic, one of the masterworks of Western philosophy. Most philosophy students have read this text, but understanding it is another matter. The text is remarkably dense and engages virtually ever theme and problem in Plato’s metaphysics, politics, cosmology, psychology, ethics, and aesthetics. In conjunction with our reading and critical discussion of the entire text of the Republic, we shall also read selections from other major Platonic dialogues that bear on individual topics in the Republic. 

Because this is an advanced seminar, students should be prepared to read and critically respond to weekly assignments of the secondary literature on Plato and the Republic. Course participants should acquire Plato Complete Works, ed. John Cooper, Hackett Publishing. 

568 - Seminar: Freud

568.001 - Freud

Instructor: Adrian Johnston
Time/s: W 12-2:30

Sigmund Freud’s enormous influence upon Western culture and the history of ideas informs not only certain varieties of therapy linked to specific theoretical models of the mind—Freud also has transformed the very way that people think and speak about themselves at an everyday level.  Who does not occasionally suspect that they and others are moved by obscure or hidden mental forces, that the reasons for observed behavior are not always what they superficially seem?  Moreover, few thinkers from one hundred years ago continue to provoke intense, heated controversy in the here-and-now.  Freud’s writings, rather than being highly specialized psychological texts focusing on sexuality and family life, are incredibly rich and wide-ranging reflections on numerous aspects of the human condition, such as the workings of memory, the relationship between mind and body, the significance of literature and art, the nature of the emotions, the function of religion, and the structure of social groups.  In several senses, understanding who we are today requires understanding Freud.  This seminar will focus on situating Freud’s thought in relation to both his modern philosophical predecessors (starting with René Descartes) as well as subsequent twentieth- and early-twenty-first-century European philosophical movements influenced by psychoanalytic theory.

569 - Seminar: Subjectivity & Presence (Theory of the Non-Subject II)

569.001 - Subjectivity & Presence (Theory of the Non-Subject II)

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: M 17-1930 (5-7:30)

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence with the overall aim of critically interrogating a variety of contemporary discourses, of both “analytic” and “continental” philosophy, which assume or affirm the substantial existence of a subject of consciousness or freedom.     We will consider these discourses drawing on phenomenological, formal, and critical approaches and work to sketch an alternative picture according to which the various phenomena traditionally treated under the heading of subjectivity can be understood, without denying or eliminating these phenomena themselves, in other terms (for instance linguistic, ontological, formal or meta-formal ones).[1]  

 This semester, we will consider the development of thematic and critical discourses of the subject within twentieth-century “continental” philosophy along two somewhat parallel and partially overlapping trajectories.  In the first of these, we will consider (through texts by Husserl, Sartre, Heidegger, and Derrida) the phenomenological development of the questions of subjectivity, consciousness, and freedom along the guideline of the question of the subject’s (traditionally essential and definitive) presence to (it)self.  We shall interrogate the traditional value of this self-presence while working simultaneously toward a phenomenologically and ontologically clarified understanding of the underlying phenomenon of presence (as it might be determined formally, temporally, and existentially).  In the second trajectory, passing through midcentury “structuralism,” we will consider the development of formal approaches to subjectivity and its foundations in relation to logical and linguistic structure.  Here we will read texts by Frege, Lacan, Miller, Badiou, and Deleuze in the light of formal results such as those of Cantor, Tarski, Russell, and Gödel.[2]   In each case, we will consider what defines or articulates a “subject position,” or the self-relation it presupposes, within or in relation to the broader formal and relational structures of language, reflexivity, identity, difference, and the world as such. By the end of the course, we shall thus hope to be in a position not only to understand the formal and phenomenological determinants of the traditional ontology of the subject but also to assay, on this basis, the space of critical alternatives to it that remain open for us today. 


 



[1] NB: The first part of the course, “Language and Consciousness” (spring 2016) considered “analytic” approaches to the problems raised here.  No material from the first semester course will be presupposed in the second and students should feel free to enroll even if they were not in the first semester course. 

[2] All formal results will be introduced and explained in an accessible and non-technical manner.