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Spring 2018

101 - Introduction to Philosophy

101.001

Instructor: Emily McRae
Time/s: MWF 9:00-9:50

This course aims to familiarize you with some of the influential classics in world philosophy. We will read classic philosophies from ancient Greece and Rome, Europe, ancient China and India. One of the mains aims of this course is to develop critical thinking skills by requiring reflection on and evaluation of philosophical texts and the development of philosophical reasoning. We will consider central philosophical topics and questions, including: What is a good life? Who is a good person? What is truth? What is real? What is the self?

101.002

Instructor: Idris Robinson
Time/s: TR 4:30-5:45

This course will investigate some of the arresting questions that have consistently reappeared throughout the history of philosophy and continue to perplex us all during our more reflective moments.  What is the nature of reality and existence?  Is there anything beyond the physical world?  Whatever might be the case, how do we know it to be true and what implications does it have on our journey through life?  

Considering both original texts and supplementary literature, our collective inquiry will start at the origins of philosophy when humanity throughout the ancient world began to ask these age-old questions about itself and its surroundings.  In particular, the first half of the semester will be mainly focus on classical antiquity and Alain Badiou’s contemporary rendition of Plato’s Republic.  In the second half of the semester, we will move through the Arabic, Renaissance, and modern periods to finally close with contemporary thinkers such as Ludwig Wittgenstein and Giorgio Agamben.

In both class discussions and writing assignments, students will have the opportunity to try to untangle these thorny philosophical issues and critically assess some of their most widely renowned theoretical responses.  

101.003

Instructor: Graham Bounds
Time/s: MWF 11:00-11:50

The ancient philosopher Aristotle once said that philosophy begins in wonder. While many disciplines are aimed at answering questions of interest mostly only for researchers in their fields, philosophy seeks to answer the big questions that in many ways define the human condition. What can we know and what can we not know? What are these things called minds, and how can I know that other people have them? What, if anything, is moral and immoral? Does God exist? Is there free will? What is the good life?

In this course, students will be introduced to some attempts by philosophers throughout history to answer these questions and others. The course will emphasize development of critical thinking skills, reading comprehension through close examination of complicated texts, and clear, thoughtful argumentative writing.

101.004

Instructor: Michael Candelaria
Time/s: MWF 2:00-2:50

This course is an introduction to philosophy.  We will survey the fundamental areas of philosophy including the following: philosophy of religion, ethics, freedom of the will, personal identity, and philosophy of mind.  Our focus will be on arguments, their analysis and evaluation. Our approach will also be a historical one. We will begin with Greek philosophy, Plato and Aristotle, then we will consider medieval philosophy, Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas. Turning out attention to modern philosophy we will examine Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will discuss nineteenth century philosophy in Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. An examination of twentieth and twenty first century philosophy will round out the course.

101.005

Instructor: Marcel Lebow
Time/s: TR 9:30-10:45

The discipline of philosophy is given short shrift in our culture today. Considered just haphazard opining, philosophizing is thought at best to be a statement one gives at a dinner party. One tells of "their philosophy," which inevitably amounts to a series of platitudes dressed up in long pauses and distant gazing. Otherwise, philosophy, it is said, has no place in contemporary society, and was just a series of lucky guesses and wild speculation only those in the past considered – a mere stand-in for a kind of thinking that the sciences now occupy.

Through a study of some of the classics of the Western philosophical tradition, this class aims to dispel such misconceptions and introduce one to the rigor and lasting relevance of the practice and study of philosophy. We will address questions that many of us wonder about at one time or another: Is there a god? What constitutes a good or evil act? Do we have souls? How do we know the external world exists? Does life have meaning?

What we will find is that philosophy at its finest delimits a field of investigation that, while informed by the sciences and other disciplines, can only be approached systematically through a kind of thinking unique to philosophy itself. Rather than a matter of paltry conjecture, philosophy puts limits on what we can say and think legitimately, and reveals to us certain possibilities of philosophical conclusion, separating from itself idle chatter and the remarks better left for books found in Barnes & Noble's quirky gifts section which predicate philosophy with one's favorite television show or movie.

Grades based on four exams.

101.006

Instructor: Mariah Partida
Time/s: TR 11:00-12:15

In this course, we will examine a wide array of key figures and concepts in the history of philosophy. In particular, we will address the following questions: What is the good life? What is the good death? What is knowledge? What is truth? What is love? What is justice? What is beauty? What's the nature of reality? What’s the relationship between mind and body, self and other, free will and determinism, being and time? What's the meaning of life? Is there a God? What is nihilism, and how should we understand it? What does it mean to read well? In what ways can we apply philosophy to our everyday lives? Proceeding historically, we will read and reflect on texts by major Western and non-Western thinkers including Plato, Aristotle, Lao Tzu, Confucius, René Descartes, Blaise Pascal, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Linda Alcoff. In the course of the semester, students taking PHIL 101 will cultivate their own philosophical voices and their ability to critically reflect on some of the most urgent ethical/political questions of our time.

101.008

Instructor: Maya Alapin
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

This course offers an abbreviated history of Western philosophy. We begin with the original Western philosophical thinkers of ancient Greece, Plato and Aristotle. We go on to investigate a critical discovery in modern philosophy – the thinking subject - through the work of Rene Descartes.  Once the foundations of ancient and modern philosophy have been established, the class will investigate the positions and philosophical theories of famous thinkers like David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Jeremy Bentham, and John Stuart Mill, Simone de Beauvoir, and Friedrich Nietzsche. The second half of the course offers students an opportunity to discuss modern and contemporary issues in philosophy, such as the role of education and technology in modern life and the demands on the individual in terms of morality and love. The class is centered on classical philosophical questions like: Does God exist? Is there such a thing as Truth? How shall we decide how to live? Who am I and what is a Self? What is the nature of reality and how shall the thinking subject relate to it? Having established footing in the Western tradition and in the main questions of ancient and modern philosophy, this class culminates by exploring still more philosophical positions and approaches from non-Western authors in the Buddhist and Yogic traditions.

 

 

101.009

Instructor: Graham Bounds
Time/s: MWF 10:00-10:50

The ancient philosopher Aristotle once said that philosophy begins in wonder. While many disciplines are aimed at answering questions of interest mostly only for researchers in their fields, philosophy seeks to answer the big questions that in many ways define the human condition. Does God exist? Do we have free will? What, if anything, is moral and immoral? What can be known and what cannot? What are these things called minds, and how are they related to bodies? In this course, students will be introduced to some attempts by philosophers throughout history to answer these questions and others, with additional emphasis on development of critical thinking skills, reading comprehension through close examination of complicated texts, and clear, thoughtful argumentative writing.

There are no required texts for the course.

101.010

Instructor: John Taber
Time/s: TR 4:00-6:30

***Second Half, 8-Week Course***

This course introduces students to basic philosophical concepts and problems, such as What is it to be moral?, Where do our notions of morality come from?, Is there life after death?, Is there a self?, What is real?, What is justice?, and What is love?, through classic readings (Plato, Nietzsche, texts from early Buddhism, etc.) and selected films. Course requirements: a midterm, a final exam, and daily in-class assignments.

101.013

Instructor: Carolyn Thomas
Time/s: ONLINE ARR

This completely online section of “Introduction to Philosophy” will introduce you philosophic wonder, thought, and thinking. We’ll read, think, question, discuss, and write about persistent philosophical questions, such as those about life's meaning, the existence of God, death, virtue, knowledge and truth, personhood, emotion, race, justice, freedom, and the philosophic life itself. 

Required work due each week includes readings, written discussion posts, and reading quizzes. Additional required semester work includes journal entries, a midterm exam, and a final exam. Coursework is due at midnight on Friday nights of each week during the semester. No textbook or text purchase required. You must have reliable Internet access, but no other special equipment is necessary.

 

156 - Reasoning & Critical Thinking

156.001

Instructor: Simon Walker
Time/s: MWF 9:00-9:50

Clear thought, logical argumentation, and the ability to articulate ourselves with precision are essential for developing a deeper relationship to the social world that we are imbedded in. Through developing these abilities we learn to present ourselves clearly both in written and spoken form, and these are skills that are pertinent to all aspects of life.

This course will introduce the main aspects of critical thought. We will start by looking at the basic concepts of argumentation and our use of language and grammar.  We will also briefly analyse the conception of 'post-truth' in current political debates After this, we will apply these skills attained by analyzing the coherence and validity of various essays in contemporary moral and political philosophy, with specific focus on environmental ethics, global inequality, and animal rights.

By the end of the class students will have a basic knowledge of argumentative structures and also a firm grasp of how to express themselves clearly. They will also be able to apply these skills to problems they encounter in their everyday lives.

Required texts: William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, and Katheryn Doran: Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills (7th ed.) (Broadview Press, 2015). ISBN: 155481197X.  (The 6th edition is also acceptable)

156.002

Instructor: Cara Greene
Time/s: MWF 10:00-10:50

Critical Thinking is a class that will teach you how to argue better. In this class, you will learn what an argument is, how to identify, dissect, and critique arguments, and finally, how to construct strong arguments within an essay format. The first half of the course will present tools for identifying and analyzing arguments, such as induction, deduction, normativity, validity, soundness, logical form, syllogisms, fallacies, and proper grammar. During the second half of the course, we will engage with articles and essays on the themes of nature, politics, art, and history in order to critically assess the presentation and thrust of the arguments contained in them. This class will be comprised of lecture, discussion, and activities, and include two short papers, two exams, and a final paper.


Required text: Hughes, Lavery and Doran, Critical Thinking, An Introduction to the Basic Skills (7th ed, Broadview Press). Recommended text: Strunk and White, The Elements of Style.

156.006

Instructor: Michael Rubio
Time/s: TR 11:00-12:15

The goal of this class is to introduce the student to critical thinking and argumentative skills. In addition to the forgoing skills the course will also challenge students to foster a critical disposition to analyze and question their own beliefs, including their most cherished beliefs e.g., religion and politics, how they have acquired these beliefs, and when and why certain beliefs should be abandoned or preserved.

As a means to mastering the skills of critical thinking and argumentation we shall explore the widespread phenomena of belief in conspiracy theories. We shall treat conspiracy theories as counter-arguments to prevailing explanations of such well known historical events as the JFK assassination, the 9/11 attacks, and the Roswell incident, among others. In examining these conspiracy theories our goal will be two-fold; one, to examine the human mind’s propensity to draw narratives and/or patterns and therefore give meaning to the world and two, to question the reasoning underlying conspiracy theories. Our goal will not be to prove whether particular conspiracy theories are true or false but to use them as empirical grounds to test and learn the critical thinking skills introduced in the course. In addition, examining conspiracy theories will show us the psychology behind belief formation and preservation. In doing so, the examination of conspiracy theories will lead us to grapple with the deep philosophical question: to what degree are humans rational and what are the limitations to rational argumentation?

The class will mix lecture, discussion, and in-class activities.

Required texts

1. Brotherton, Rob: Suspicious Minds: Why we Believe Conspiracy Theories (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2015). ISBN: 9781472915634.

2. Hughes, William, Jonathan Lavery, and Katheryn Doran: Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills (7th ed.) (Broadview Press, 2015). ISBN: 155481197X.

3. Strunk, William and E.B. White. The Elements of Style (4th edition) (Pearson, 2000). ISBN: 978-0205313426. This text is fairly inexpensive at only 6.99 for a new copy on Amazon.com.

4. Recommended but not required: Hodapp, Christopher and Alice Von Kannon. Conspiracy Theories and Secret Societies for Dummies (Wiley, 2008). ISBN: 978-470184080. 


Requirements: 3 argumentative essays, 2 short midterms, quizzes and in-class assignments.

156.008

Instructor: Elizabeth Van Mil
Time/s: MW 4:30-5:45

In this course, students will learn to critically assess claims and arguments, to distinguish bad from good arguments, using the basic elements of critical thinking, and further developing skills in good reasoning and analyzing others’ arguments and creating one’s own.  The first part of the course will introduce informal logic and informal fallacies to learn the skills needed to critically assess arguments, while the second part will be focused on applying those skills to various kinds of arguments that are prevalent in the contemporary media and discourse. The required textbook is Critical Thinking: An Introduction to the Basic Skills – American, Seventh Edition, by William Hughes, Jonathan Lavery, and Katheryn Doran, plus other materials that will be posted on UNM Learn.

156.010

Instructor: Zac Turnbull
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

This course will introduce students to the rigorous analysis of arguments. In the first half of the course, we will learn the linguistic and conceptual skills necessary for recognizing, analyzing, and critically evaluating arguments, including deductive, inductive, moral, and fallacious arguments. Through reading and writing we will learn what may make an argument sound or cogent. Our focus will then shift to recognizing and critiquing poor arguments. In the second half of the course, we will look at a variety of political philosophical texts with which to apply these concepts of reasoning. Texts may include selections from Locke, Mill, Goldman, Rawls, Korsgaard, Davis, Goldman, and Geronimo.

The first and most important objective of the course is that we should develop the skills and tools to confront the arguments we encounter in academic life, daily life, and in public discourse. We will examine and reexamine what we think makes for a good argument, and what counts as good reasons for believing something. The second objective is that we should gain familiarity with some important political philosophy, as a means to better understand our contemporary political and social situation. We will explore the arguments made by political thinkers, and apply our learnt critical skills to them. In doing this, I hope we will together develop our ideas of what counts as 'justice' and how justice might best be achieved today. 

201 - Greek Thought

201.001

Instructor: Joachim Oberst
Time/s: MWF 10:00-10:50

In this course we undertake a radical transition in historical perspective (of some 2000 to 2600 years) back to the foundations of Western Philosophy. Students are expected to engage in the discovery and exploration of ancient texts whose language, composition, style and philosophical substance will at first contact appear unusual and even strange. In many cases the text will look like an incomplete puzzle (which in fact they often are). Making sense of these texts will take some devotion on the part of the student. Through serious study and consultation of the texts, some of their manifold messages will become apparent. It is the goal of this course to introduce students to the original sources of their own thinking so that they can discover the extent to which current ideas are indebted to and imbedded in ancient Greek thought.

After a quick glance at Hesiod’s mythological worldview, we will literally start with the "first philosophers" known as the "Presocratics" and look at some of the fragments of their rich work that have survived more than two millennia. We will then move to the literary works of Plato and read a selection of his earlier and middle dialogues (on death and love). We shall see how important aspects of these ideas find exploration on the Greek stage as we look at some plays by Aristophanes (comedy) and Euripides (tragedy). In Aristotle we will discover an encyclopedic mind, who devoted his philosophical research to all aspects of (human) life. We will look at selections of his philosophical lectures on nature, language, physics and metaphysics. To conclude the course we will take a brief excursion into the Hellenistic world where we shall encounter the Epicureans, the Stoics, the Cynics and the Skeptics with their theological, epistemological and ethical worldviews.

There is no prerequisite to this course. In addition to offering stimulation for intellectual development and personal enrichment through the philological treatment of texts, the course will prepare students to participate in other courses in philosophy and the humanities at large, especially in classics and the history of philosophy. The course can also be illuminating for students of the natural sciences.

201.002

Instructor: Pierre-Julien Harter
Time/s: TR 11:00-12:15

Perhaps there never was a “Greek miracle,” as some have called it, but ancient Greek civilization certainly produced one of the most impressive periods of cultural and intellectual flourishing in human history.  During that period, cultural and political institutions -- including history, philosophy, and democracy -- were invented, and since then, these institutions have been adopted and pursued around the globe – making Greek thought not only an ancestor to Western civilizations, but to many others.

In this course, we will read classic works of Greek literature that were produced between the 8th century CE to the 2nd century CE, including The Odyssey, Antigone, and the Apology of Socrates.  We will examine different kinds of literary works produced during this period, such as an epic poem from Homer, a play by Sophocles, philosophical dialogues of Plato, and treatises of Aristotle, Epicurus, Epictetus, and Plotinus.  Our goal throughout will be to distill from this survey the themes and questions that characterize Greek thought. We will gain an appreciation of the lasting impact that Greek thought has on our approach to questions concerning metaphysics, ethics, and politics, but also how it can offer a powerful counter perspective to our most dearly held beliefs and assumptions.

202 - Descartes to Kant

202.001

Instructor: David Liakos
Time/s: MWF 11:00-11:50

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of the main philosophical movements and texts of the early modern period, or the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, in Europe. We will understand the philosophy of this era in the context of the Protestant Reformation and the Scientific Revolution, both of which motivated philosophers to establish how knowledge was possible. The main philosophical themes of the period, which will be the focus of the course, include the skeptical challenge to the possibility of human knowledge, the radical shift in our understanding of the place of human beings in nature in the wake of advancements in the natural sciences, the role of God as a metaphysical starting point to guarantee timeless truth, and the alienation of scientific ontology from the phenomenal qualities of everyday human experience. In sum, we will interrogate and uncover the philosophical foundations of what is called “modernity.” After looking at Montaigne’s influential articulation of Pyrrhonian skepticism, we will turn to Descartes’s epochal attempt to discover certain foundations for knowledge and a method for the sciences. With Descartes, we will have articulated the main agenda for the rest of early modern philosophy up until the end of the eighteenth century, which attempted to improve upon or replace aspects of Descartes’s system while remaining within the broad contours of the priorities he set for philosophical enquiry. Thus we will turn to subsequent “rationalist” metaphysical systems, including those of Leibniz and Conway, as well as the “empiricist” philosophy emerging in Great Britain initiated by Locke and subsequently radicalized by Berkeley and Hume. Finally, we will end the course with Kant, who, according to some readings, attempted to synthesize both rationalism and empiricism into a radically new philosophical method known as “transcendental philosophy” that would avoid the pitfalls of both approaches while also attempting to answer the question of the possibility of knowledge. This course is essential background for understanding the philosophical developments of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.   

 

Required texts: (1) An Apology for Raymond Sebond, Michel de Montaigne (Penguin) (ISBN: 9780140444933); (2) Modern Philosophy: An Anthology of Primary Sources (2nd ed.), Roger Ariew and Eric Watkins, eds. (Hackett) (ISBN: 9780872209787). Other readings will be made available via UNM Learn.

202.002

Instructor: Barbara Hannan
Time/s: TR 2:00-3:15

This course covers the major metaphysical and epistemological works of the early modern Rationalists (Descartes, Leibniz, and Spinoza) and Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, and Hume).  The course concludes with consideration of Kant’s critical philosophy.  Our textbook will be Ariew and Watkins, Modern Philosophy:  An Anthology of Primary Sources (Hackett), latest edition.

211 - Greek Philosophy

211.001

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: TR 11:00-12:15

Philosophy in the western tradition begins with the ancient Greeks and there is no better introduction to philosophy than to study their thought and writing. In this course, we will attempt to develop an original path of questioning in critical dialogue with the Greeks, with the aim of locating ourselves and the problems of contemporary life more centrally within the problematics that they already pursued. Issues to be discussed include, among others: the nature of thought, reason and the soul; the structure of time and space; language, meaning, and truth; being, change and becoming; ethics and the good; life and death. Readings are from various Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus.

Course requirements: weekly short reading responses, three short tests (open book, in class) and final examination (open book).

211.002

Instructor: Carolyn Thomas
Time/s: ONLINE ARR

This completely online course is an introduction to the ancient Greek beginnings of philosophy in the western tradition. We’ll read the ancient Greek philosophers themselves—several Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus—and engage their fundamental questions and concerns, which today can still touch and interest every person. These questions include: What are nature and reality? What is a good life? What are being, becoming, and change? What are reason, language, truth, and knowing? What are love and friendship? What is education? And, what is philosophy itself?

Required weekly work includes readings, written discussion posts, and reading quizzes. Additional required semester work includes journal entries, a midterm exam, and a final exam. Coursework is due at the end of each week, at midnight on Sunday nights. You must have reliable Internet access, but no other special equipment is required.

245 - Professional Ethics

245.001

Instructor: Brian Gatsch
Time/s: ONLINE ARR

This online course focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in the context of professional life.  Beginning with an overview of three major ethical theories, we will consider how these theories, which traditionally concern personal morality, apply to life in a professional setting.  We will also examine the roles and obligations associated with professional life. What is the relationship between personal and professional codes of conduct? What distinguishes professions from other occupations?  Through the lens of various professions, we will look at issues such as lying and truth-telling, whistleblowing, confidentiality, and the obligations of professionals toward the public.  Using a combination of readings, case studies, and online discussion groups, we will explore these ideas in a philosophical manner, looking to understand the ethical principles at work.  This course will give students a solid introduction to ethical reasoning and will help to develop the tools necessary to apply ethical principles to real-world settings.

Required text:

Ethics Across the Professions: A Reader for Professional Ethics, 2nd ed, Clancy Martin, Wayne Vaught, and Robert C. Solomon, editors. OUP. (ISBN-13: 978-0190298708/ISBN-10: 0190298707)

350 - Philosophy of Science

350.001

Instructor: Mary Domski
Time/s: TR 8:00-9:15

Looking at the transitions from Aristotle to Newton and Newton to Einstein, we seem to have ample historical evidence that our best scientific theories will be replaced, or at least continue to undergo major revisions.  It seems to follow that we’d be naïve to claim that science can give us a true account of nature.  Any truth today could be an outright falsehood tomorrow!  Or maybe this isn’t the correct lesson to draw from the historical evidence.  Does history in fact demand that we relinquish science’s claim to truth and objectivity?  Or is there a way that we can save the truth and objectivity of science from the apparently negative lessons of history?  In this course we will examine such questions and investigate how the history of science has changed our philosophical accounts of what genuine scientific practice involves.  We will focus on the Copernican and Newtonian Revolutions of the 17th Century during the first portion of the course, and then turn our attention to the 20th Century development of Relativity Theory and Quantum Mechanics.  These historical episodes in the physical sciences will serve as a basis for our examination of the nature of scientific practice.  We will look at a variety of philosophical positions on scientific explanation, truth, and theory-building ranging from 19th Century positivism to contemporary post-modernism (including the sociological and feminist critiques of science). 

352 - Theory of Knowledge

352.001

Instructor: Graham Bounds
Time/s: MWF 10:00-10:50

This course seeks to provide a broad introduction to the theory of knowledge (epistemology) through exposure to many of the most important topics in the field, including: arguments for and against external world skepticism, internalist vs. externalist views of justification, various analyses of the definition of knowledge, foundationalism vs. coherentism, and the nature of a priori knowledge. We will gain a familiarity with some of the classic texts in these debates, and will emphasize not only comprehension of the issues and positions themselves, but also the interrelations between these different topics. Additionally, we will get a sense of some unique theoretical standpoints within the field, such as virtue epistemology and programs to naturalize epistemology.

356 - Symbolic Logic

356.001

Instructor: Barbara Hannan
Time/s: TR 11:00-12:40

This course covers SL (Sentential Logic), and begins the study of PL (Predicate Logic).  In association with SL, we will cover the characteristic truth-tables defining the logical operators signifying negation, conjunction, disjunction, material conditional, and material biconditional.  We will learn to use semantic methods (truth-tables and truth-trees) in order to prove that sentences, sets of sentences, and arguments in SL have various formal properties, such as truth-functional truth, truth-functional falsehood, truth-functional indeterminacy, consistency, inconsistency, and validity.  We will also learn to use syntactical rule systems (natural deduction systems) to derive sentences in SL from sets of sentences that entail them.  With regard to PL, our coverage will be limited to basic syntax and translation, and some elementary derivations in PD+, a natural deduction system for predicate logic.  Our textbook will be Bergmann, Moor, and Nelson, The Logic Book (McGraw-Hill), latest edition.

358 - Ethical Theory

358.001

Instructor: Emily McRae
Time/s: MWF 11:00-11:50

This philosophy course aims to provide you with a firm philosophical foundation in some of the influential classics in Western and non-Western moral philosophy.  We will read some of the classic historical texts in-depth, with a focus both on engaged interpretation and critical analysis. We will explore topics in theoretical ethics such as the nature of right and wrong; happiness and well-being; and justice and injustice. This course also aims to increase your facility with dense philosophical texts and hone your critical and creative thinking skills, particularly with regard to ethical issues.

365 - Philosophy of Religion

365.001

Instructor: Michael Candelaria
Time/s: MWF 11:00-11:50

This course explores the fundamental themes of the philosophy of religion—the nature of a maximally perfect being, the arguments for the existence of God, religious and mystical experience. Of special interest will be the problem of religious language. Is religious language descriptive or non-descriptive? Is religious language meaningful or meaningless? Are religious symbols moral emotive or cognitive? Is religious language poetic-ethical? Our sources will come from modern and contemporary philosophy and from Christian, Judaic, Hindu, and Buddhist sources.

372 - Modern Social & Political Philosophy

372.001

Instructor: Carolyn Thomas
Time/s: TR 3:30-4:45

What is a modern state? A modern citizen? What are freedom, rights, authority sovereignty? What is power—public, individual, economic/material, intellectual, technological—in political society? These questions will guide our course and introduction to modern social and political thinking of continental Europe and America. We’ll begin with classic modern thinkers: Locke, Rousseau, ‘Publius,’ Mill, Tocqueville, Marx. We’ll continue with later modern and contemporary thinkers, such as Gramsci, Adorno, Althusser, Arendt, Rawls, Foucault, Habermas, Agamben. 

Course requirements and learning assessments include: class attendance and participation, thoughtful reading and study of assigned texts, quizzes, take-home short-essay exercises, and two or three exams. Expect to spend at least 4-6 hours each week on reading assignments.

Prerequisites: either PHIL 101 or PHIL 202 or PHIL 371 or permission of the instructor.  

381 - Philosophy of Law

381.001

Instructor: Ann Murphy
Time/s: MWF 10:00-10:50

This course is intended as an introduction to the philosophy of law.  The aim of the course is to give students a sense of the scope and application of the most central theories and problems in the philosophy of law.  Topics under consideration will be: the nature of law’s authority; the nature of punishment; the relationship between law and morality; race, gender and the law; and legal sanctuary.   PHIL 381 aims to give students a sense of the historical evolution of the philosophy of law as well as its most important contemporary theories and problems.  We will cover ancient philosophical texts as well as work by contemporary authors.  Lastly, the course will address the significance of what it means to approach the law philosophically.

426 - Self & Consciousness in Indian Philosophy

426.001

Instructor: John Taber
Time/s: M 4:00-6:30

Issues concerning the self and consciousness loom large in Indian philosophy. In those traditions that acknowledged the ideal of liberation from the cycle of rebirth upon some kind of awakening, a correct understanding of the nature of the self was considered an essential aspect of awakening. Differing views of the self and consciousness also became the focus of debates between traditions over many centuries. In this seminar we will read (in translation) texts that concern three problems: (1) the existence of a self; (2) the relation of cognition to the complex of body-mind-and-senses; and (2) the (Yogācāra Buddhist) claim that everything is just consciousness. In exploring the first problem we will study the Buddha’s inscrutable position regarding the existence of a self and later, more explicit Buddhist attempts to prove that there is no self (in such texts as the Milindapañha [“The Questions of Milinda”] and the ninth chapter of Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośabhāṣya). We will go on to consider the Brahmanical (Hindu) answer to the Buddhist position as developed in Nyāya literature, especially the proofs of the existence of a self and critique of the Buddhist refutation of a self in Vātsyāyana’s Nyāyabhāṣya. For the second problem we will study the Nyāya theory of (empirical) cognition, also as presented in Nyāyabhāṣya, as well as the Sāṃkhya theory of the (illusory) reflection of the consciousness of the self in the intellect and mind (Sāṃkhyakārikā and corresponding passages from the Yuktidīpikā commentary). Finally, in the third part of the course we will study Buddhist idealism, including the arguments (from Vasubandhu and Dharmakīrti) purporting to prove non-existence of an external world, and the debate about whether cognition is just self-awareness (that is, whether cognition is able to apprehend itself – a presupposition of idealism).

Students previously unacquainted with Indian philosophy are welcome. An effort will be made to provide sufficient historical and philosophical background to contextualize the issues. Most, if not all, readings will be posted on BlackboardLearn. The course will be conducted as a seminar, with final papers and possibly presentations falling due toward the end of the term.

442 - Sem: Foucault

442.001

Instructor: Michael Candelaria
Time/s: MWF 1:00-1:50

This course examines the major writings of one of the most exciting and iconoclastic writers of the twentieth century whose works carved inroads into philosophy, social theory, history, political science, literary theory, anthropology, psychology and psychiatric theory. In Madness and Civilization, he examined madness and folly from the Renaissance to the Modern Era establishing that mental illness is not a given. Examining ways in which knowledge of the world was ordered during these same periods, he showed in The Order of Things how epistemic structures are constructed especially concerning grammar, wealth and life. On this basis, he offers a discursive explanation for understanding the conditions for the possibility of linguistics, biology, economic theory and the other human sciences in the nineteenth century. We will also explore his unique theory of language, discourse and discursive practices in The Archaeology of Knowledge. In Discipline and Knowledge as well as The History of Sexuality, our attention focuses on the link power/knowledge, the concepts of micro-power, bio-politics, and the link between power/knowledge and the production of sex and sexuality as discursive knowledges and practices. Along the way, we will examine his sources in Nietzsche, Heidegger, Bachelard, and Canguilhem. We will also consider his theories of art and literature. To bring the course to a close we will discuss the major philosophical, socio-theoretical, feminists, and literary theorists critiques of Foucault by J. Habermas, Derrida, Nancy Fraser and others.

454 - Sem: Mental Causation

454.001

Instructor: Kelly Becker
Time/s: T 4:00-6:30

The idea that mind and body causally interact is central to our self-conceptions.  We take ourselves to be agents insofar as our beliefs and desires cause our bodies to move in aspiring to achieve our ends.  Physical contact causes conscious feelings of pleasure and pain, among other sensations.  When Descartes argued that mind and body are distinct substances, only the latter existing in space, Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia wrote to ask how they could possibly interact, and the mind-body problem came into sharp focus.  A fairly obvious suggestion is that, somehow, the mind just is part of the body, presumably the brain.  But there are many ways to understand that claim, and among those most commonly accepted in contemporary metaphysics and philosophy of mind, the causal efficacy of the mental as such remains mysterious.  We will begin the seminar with one or two “historical” readings, but will then concentrate on more recent work.  Theories of mind that we will discuss include substance dualism, type identity, token identity, supervenience (in various formulations), and functionalism (where of course some of these ideas overlap).  We shall also look at issues surrounding causation: joint causation, overdetermination, counterfactual dependence, and epiphenomenalism. 

Readings: TBA, most of them available on Learn. 

Requirements: two short papers (4-5 pp.) and one seminar paper (8-10 pp. undergraduates; 10-15pp. graduates)

Also, for an alternative introduction to ideas in the seminar, this from Stanford Encyclopedia:

Questions about the existence and nature of mental causation are prominent in contemporary discussions of the mind and human agency. Originally, the problem of mental causation was that of understanding how an immaterial mind, a soul, could interact with the body. Most philosophers nowadays repudiate souls, but the problem of mental causation has not gone away. Instead, focus has shifted to mental properties. How could mental properties be causally relevant to bodily behavior? How could something mental qua mental cause what it does?

 Robb, David and Heil, John, "Mental Causation"The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.)

457 - Sem: Plato & Plotinus

457.001

Instructor: Pierre-Julien Harter
Time/s: TR 2:00-3:15

Being has been taken to be the “ontological standard” in Greek philosophy.  Quite famously, Aristotle claimed that metaphysics is, by definition, the investigation of being (qua being).  However, attempts to define "being" have often led philosophers to uncover an area of reality that does not quite fit the definition – an area that is "beneath being," or "exceeds being", in other terms, an area of reality that, while not being nothing, and while not being, still appears to “be something.” Plato and Plotinus have been the instigators of such a line of inquiry that has found heirs even in contemporary philosophy. They have elaborated systematic thoughts, if not systems, that address what it is that we call being, and its relation to what is beyond it, such as the Good or the One. We will follow Plato in his attempt to set up a definite way to talk about being in some of his minor dialogues and the Republic, and more closely in three of his so called “metaphysical dialogues:” the Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Parmenides. A firm grasp of Plato’s project will help us to explore the subject further with Plotinus’ Enneads. We will focus on Plotinus’ own individual contribution by highlighting the more “existential” or soteriological approach he adopted to those metaphysical problems.

469 - Sem: Problems of Phenomenology

469.001

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: R 4:00-6:30

The phenomenological tradition begun by Edmund Husserl has played a central role in twentieth-century “continental” philosophy, underlying the methods and results of figures including Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and many more.  More recently, many have suggested important connections between phenomenological methods and the contemporary projects of analytic philosophy, including philosophy of mind, epistemology, logic, and metaphysics. 

The aim of this seminar will be to develop an understanding of phenomenology, both as a set of practices and as a living tradition, and explore the possibility, significance, and implications of its continued development and application today.  In the first part of the course, we will study closely the texts in which Husserl initially defined phenomenology as the study of structures of intentional consciousness from a first-person point of view, including his development of the ideas of “transcendental” phenomenological reflection, eidetic and categorial intuition, and the constitutive phenomenological analysis of phenomena such as time, language, and truth.  We will then move on to consider Heidegger’s radicalizing critique of Husserl’s phenomenological methods in his lecture courses of the early and middle 1920s, leading up to the distinctive methodology of “phenomenological ontology” of Being and Time, and Sartre and Merleau-Ponty’s different developments of Husserl’s methodology to consider the originally “negative” structure of consciousness and the experience of the body as lived.  In the final part of the course, we will consider some more recent applications and connections of classical phenomenological methods to problems in contemporary analytic philosophy of mind, including the problems of the naturalization of consciousness and the structures of intentional meaning and cognition, as well as the possible application of phenomenological methods to central problems in the metaphysics of time, the philosophy of mathematics, and the logic of truth.

Readings will include portions of: Husserl, Logical Investigations (1900-01);  Husserl, Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy I (1912); Husserl, Cartesian Meditations (1931); Heidegger, History of the Concept of Time (1925); Heidegger, The Basic Problems of Phenomenology (1927); Sartre, Being and Nothingness (1943), Merleau-Ponty, Phenomenology of Perception (1945); Thomasson and Smith, ed., Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind (2005); Petitot, et al., ed., Naturalizing Phenomenology (1999); Livingston, The Logic of Being: Realism, Truth, and Time (2017). 

480 - Philosophy and Literature

480.001*

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: TR 12:30-1:45

We will begin this course by seeking to understand the role popular works of literary art can play historically in shaping and transforming humanity’s most basic sense of what is and what matters.  Once that post-Heideggerian background is in place, we will turn to read a handful of the popular contemporary literary texts that focus centrally on the fundamental existential question of how to understand the relation between life and death and the role of love in helping to explain the meaning of hope for the future.  We will read both esoteric and apparently exoteric texts, including some of the most wildly popular works of the last decade, but we will be reading these popular works in ways that look beyond their surface appeal and seek to disclose their deeper, more esoteric philosophical contents.  Our goal will be to better comprehend the contributions these popular works of literary art make to humanity’s contemporary thinking about the meaning of life, death, love, and hope. 

Course Requirements:  This course will require a great deal of sometimes difficult and challenging reading.  To facilitate your digestions of these works, attendance is required.  Grades will be based on attendance and two take-home essays (for undergraduates) or a single research paper (for graduate students). 

Required Texts:  1).  J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Levine books, 2007); 2). Cormac McCarthy, The Road (Vintage, 2006); 3). Don Delillo, Zero K (Scribner, 2016); 4). Thomson, Heidegger, Art, and Postmodernity (Cambridge, 2011); 5). Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, Watchmen (DC Comics, 2014); and 6). 

486 - Sem: Heidegger's Black Notebooks

486.001

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: W 5:30-8:00

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is widely recognized as one of the most influential and important philosophers of the 20th century, but a renewed controversy about the relation of his thinking to National Socialism and anti-Semitism has once again engulfed the discussion of his work.  In this weekly graduate seminar, we will carefully study the recently published works at the heart of this controversy, Heidegger’s so-called Black Notebooks.  Reading these private notebooks — in which Heidegger frequently recorded his thoughts at (and on) the time — will provide us with some fascinating, illuminating, and sometimes disturbing perspectives on the important period that surrounds Heidegger’s so-called “Rectorate,” that is, his period of active duty as the Nazi Rector of Freiburg University (from May 1933 to April 1934), as well as on the extended (and deeply problematic) aftermath of this political period.  These notebooks can thus help us better understand the philosophical thinking responsible for Heidegger’s disastrously failed political venture, his attempt to intervene in politics directly in order to help lead Germany’s spiritual development educationally.  They can also help us try to understand what important philosophical lessons Heidegger learned, and failed to learn, from this most controversial period of his life and work.  As we will see, some of the major transformations on display in these Black Notebooks include Heidegger’s dawning insight into the polysemic nature of being and his consequent development of a poetic style, a style (paradigmatically “continental”) that Heidegger thinks is necessary to do justice to being’s apparently inexhaustible phenomenological riches.  In this way, the Black Notebooks let us see how Heidegger’s definitive later insight into ontological pluralism emerged from the terrible crucible of his otherwise disastrous politics, among some rather less edifying lessons.  Reading the Black Notebooks can thus help us understand the years of Heidegger’s greatest political and philosophical turmoil and transformation —his (would be) revolutionary “middle” period (circa 1929-1937), which connects and also separates Heidegger’s more famous “early” (pre-1929) and “later” (post-1937) philosophical thinking.  This course will be important for anyone seeking to come to terms with the prospects and perils of philosophical revolution and revolutionary philosophy. 

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing or background in Heidegger’s work.  Course Requirements:  This course will require a great deal of difficult and challenging reading.  As this is a class in the art of slow reading, students will be expected to do the reading ahead of time and bring the appropriate books to every class for careful discussion.  Grades will be based on one independent research paper (with in-class presentations potentially taken into account as well), for graduate students, or two philosophy papers (for undergraduates).  Required texts:  1). Heidegger, Ponderings II-VI: Black Notebooks 1931-1938 (Indiana UP, 2016); 2).  Heidegger,Ponderings VII-XI:  Black Notebooks 1938-1939 (Indiana UP, 2017); 3). Heidegger, Ponderings XII–XV: Black Notebooks 1939–1941 (Indiana UP, 2017); 4) Thomson, Heidegger on Ontotheology:  Technology and the Politics of Education (Cambridge UP, 2005).  Recommended texts:  Will include selections from 1).  Ingo Farin and Jeff Malpas, Reading Heidegger’s Black Notebooks: 1931-1941 (MIT, 2016); and from 2). Alfred Denker and Holger Zaborowski, eds, Zur Hermeneutik der ‘Schwarzen Hefte’:  Heidegger Jahrbuch 10 (Freiburg:  Karl Alber, Nov. 2017).L.-M. Miranda, Hamilton:  The Revolution! (Grand Central Publishing, 2016).

526 - Self & Consciousness in Indian Philosophy

526.001

Instructor: John Taber
Time/s: M 4:00-6:30

Issues concerning the self and consciousness loom large in Indian philosophy. In those traditions that acknowledged the ideal of liberation from the cycle of rebirth upon some kind of awakening, a correct understanding of the nature of the self was considered an essential aspect of awakening. Differing views of the self and consciousness also became the focus of debates between traditions over many centuries. In this seminar we will read (in translation) texts that concern three problems: (1) the existence of a self; (2) the relation of cognition to the complex of body-mind-and-senses; and (2) the (Yogācāra Buddhist) claim that everything is just consciousness. In exploring the first problem we will study the Buddha’s inscrutable position regarding the existence of a self and later, more explicit Buddhist attempts to prove that there is no self (in such texts as the Milindapañha [“The Questions of Milinda”] and the ninth chapter of Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośabhāṣya). We will go on to consider the Brahmanical (Hindu) answer to the Buddhist position as developed in Nyāya literature, especially the proofs of the existence of a self and critique of the Buddhist refutation of a self in Vātsyāyana’s Nyāyabhāṣya. For the second problem we will study the Nyāya theory of (empirical) cognition, also as presented in Nyāyabhāṣya, as well as the Sāṃkhya theory of the (illusory) reflection of the consciousness of the self in the intellect and mind (Sāṃkhyakārikā and corresponding passages from the Yuktidīpikā commentary). Finally, in the third part of the course we will study Buddhist idealism, including the arguments (from Vasubandhu and Dharmakīrti) purporting to prove non-existence of an external world, and the debate about whether cognition is just self-awareness (that is, whether cognition is able to apprehend itself – a presupposition of idealism).

Students previously unacquainted with Indian philosophy are welcome. An effort will be made to provide sufficient historical and philosophical background to contextualize the issues. Most, if not all, readings will be posted on BlackboardLearn. The course will be conducted as a seminar, with final papers and possibly presentations falling due toward the end of the term.

554 - Sem: Mental Causation

554.001

Instructor: Kelly Becker
Time/s: T 4:00-6:30

The idea that mind and body causally interact is central to our self-conceptions.  We take ourselves to be agents insofar as our beliefs and desires cause our bodies to move in aspiring to achieve our ends.  Physical contact causes conscious feelings of pleasure and pain, among other sensations.  When Descartes argued that mind and body are distinct substances, only the latter existing in space, Princess Elizabeth of Bohemia wrote to ask how they could possibly interact, and the mind-body problem came into sharp focus.  A fairly obvious suggestion is that, somehow, the mind just is part of the body, presumably the brain.  But there are many ways to understand that claim, and among those most commonly accepted in contemporary metaphysics and philosophy of mind, the causal efficacy of the mental as such remains mysterious.  We will begin the seminar with one or two “historical” readings, but will then concentrate on more recent work.  Theories of mind that we will discuss include substance dualism, type identity, token identity, supervenience (in various formulations), and functionalism (where of course some of these ideas overlap).  We shall also look at issues surrounding causation: joint causation, overdetermination, counterfactual dependence, and epiphenomenalism. 

Readings: TBA, most of them available on Learn. 

Requirements: two short papers (4-5 pp.) and one seminar paper (8-10 pp. undergraduates; 10-15pp. graduates)

Also, for an alternative introduction to ideas in the seminar, this from Stanford Encyclopedia:

Questions about the existence and nature of mental causation are prominent in contemporary discussions of the mind and human agency. Originally, the problem of mental causation was that of understanding how an immaterial mind, a soul, could interact with the body. Most philosophers nowadays repudiate souls, but the problem of mental causation has not gone away. Instead, focus has shifted to mental properties. How could mental properties be causally relevant to bodily behavior? How could something mental qua mental cause what it does?

 Robb, David and Heil, John, "Mental Causation"The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.)

557 - Sem: Plato & Plotinus

557.001

Instructor: Pierre-Julien Harter
Time/s: TR 2:00-3:15

Being has been taken to be the “ontological standard” in Greek philosophy.  Quite famously, Aristotle claimed that metaphysics is, by definition, the investigation of being (qua being).  However, attempts to define "being" have often led philosophers to uncover an area of reality that does not quite fit the definition – an area that is "beneath being," or "exceeds being", in other terms, an area of reality that, while not being nothing, and while not being, still appears to “be something.” Plato and Plotinus have been the instigators of such a line of inquiry that has found heirs even in contemporary philosophy. They have elaborated systematic thoughts, if not systems, that address what it is that we call being, and its relation to what is beyond it, such as the Good or the One. We will follow Plato in his attempt to set up a definite way to talk about being in some of his minor dialogues and the Republic, and more closely in three of his so called “metaphysical dialogues:” the Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Parmenides. A firm grasp of Plato’s project will help us to explore the subject further with Plotinus’ Enneads. We will focus on Plotinus’ own individual contribution by highlighting the more “existential” or soteriological approach he adopted to those metaphysical problems.

569 - Sem: Problems of Phenomenology

569.001

Instructor: Paul Livingston
Time/s: R 4:00-6:30

The phenomenological tradition begun by Edmund Husserl has played a central role in twentieth-century “continental” philosophy, underlying the methods and results of figures including Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and many more.  More recently, many have suggested important connections between phenomenological methods and the contemporary projects of analytic philosophy, including philosophy of mind, epistemology, logic, and metaphysics. 

The aim of this seminar will be to develop an understanding of phenomenology, both as a set of practices and as a living tradition, and explore the possibility, significance, and implications of its continued development and application today.  In the first part of the course, we will study closely the texts in which Husserl initially defined phenomenology as the study of structures of intentional consciousness from a first-person point of view, including his development of the ideas of “transcendental” phenomenological reflection, eidetic and categorial intuition, and the constitutive phenomenological analysis of phenomena such as time, language, and truth.  We will then move on to consider Heidegger’s radicalizing critique of Husserl’s phenomenological methods in his lecture courses of the early and middle 1920s, leading up to the distinctive methodology of “phenomenological ontology” of Being and Time, and Sartre and Merleau-Ponty’s different developments of Husserl’s methodology to consider the originally “negative” structure of consciousness and the experience of the body as lived.  In the final part of the course, we will consider some more recent applications and connections of classical phenomenological methods to problems in contemporary analytic philosophy of mind, including the problems of the naturalization of consciousness and the structures of intentional meaning and cognition, as well as the possible application of phenomenological methods to central problems in the metaphysics of time, the philosophy of mathematics, and the logic of truth.

Readings will include portions of: Husserl, Logical Investigations (1900-01);  Husserl, Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy I (1912); Husserl, Cartesian Meditations (1931); Heidegger, History of the Concept of Time (1925); Heidegger, The Basic Problems of Phenomenology (1927); Sartre, Being and Nothingness (1943), Merleau-Ponty, Phenomenology of Perception (1945); Thomasson and Smith, ed., Phenomenology and Philosophy of Mind (2005); Petitot, et al., ed., Naturalizing Phenomenology (1999); Livingston, The Logic of Being: Realism, Truth, and Time (2017). 

586 - Sem: Heidegger's Black Notebooks

586.001

Instructor: Iain Thomson
Time/s: W 5:30-8:00

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) is widely recognized as one of the most influential and important philosophers of the 20th century, but a renewed controversy about the relation of his thinking to National Socialism and anti-Semitism has once again engulfed the discussion of his work.  In this weekly graduate seminar, we will carefully study the recently published works at the heart of this controversy, Heidegger’s so-called Black Notebooks.  Reading these private notebooks — in which Heidegger frequently recorded his thoughts at (and on) the time — will provide us with some fascinating, illuminating, and sometimes disturbing perspectives on the important period that surrounds Heidegger’s so-called “Rectorate,” that is, his period of active duty as the Nazi Rector of Freiburg University (from May 1933 to April 1934), as well as on the extended (and deeply problematic) aftermath of this political period.  These notebooks can thus help us better understand the philosophical thinking responsible for Heidegger’s disastrously failed political venture, his attempt to intervene in politics directly in order to help lead Germany’s spiritual development educationally.  They can also help us try to understand what important philosophical lessons Heidegger learned, and failed to learn, from this most controversial period of his life and work.  As we will see, some of the major transformations on display in these Black Notebooks include Heidegger’s dawning insight into the polysemic nature of being and his consequent development of a poetic style, a style (paradigmatically “continental”) that Heidegger thinks is necessary to do justice to being’s apparently inexhaustible phenomenological riches.  In this way, the Black Notebooks let us see how Heidegger’s definitive later insight into ontological pluralism emerged from the terrible crucible of his otherwise disastrous politics, among some rather less edifying lessons.  Reading the Black Notebooks can thus help us understand the years of Heidegger’s greatest political and philosophical turmoil and transformation —his (would be) revolutionary “middle” period (circa 1929-1937), which connects and also separates Heidegger’s more famous “early” (pre-1929) and “later” (post-1937) philosophical thinking.  This course will be important for anyone seeking to come to terms with the prospects and perils of philosophical revolution and revolutionary philosophy. 

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing or background in Heidegger’s work.  Course Requirements:  This course will require a great deal of difficult and challenging reading.  As this is a class in the art of slow reading, students will be expected to do the reading ahead of time and bring the appropriate books to every class for careful discussion.  Grades will be based on one independent research paper (with in-class presentations potentially taken into account as well), for graduate students, or two philosophy papers (for undergraduates).  Required texts:  1). Heidegger, Ponderings II-VI: Black Notebooks 1931-1938 (Indiana UP, 2016); 2).  Heidegger,Ponderings VII-XI:  Black Notebooks 1938-1939 (Indiana UP, 2017); 3). Heidegger, Ponderings XII–XV: Black Notebooks 1939–1941 (Indiana UP, 2017); 4) Thomson, Heidegger on Ontotheology:  Technology and the Politics of Education (Cambridge UP, 2005).  Recommended texts:  Will include selections from 1).  Ingo Farin and Jeff Malpas, Reading Heidegger’s Black Notebooks: 1931-1941 (MIT, 2016); and from 2). Alfred Denker and Holger Zaborowski, eds, Zur Hermeneutik der ‘Schwarzen Hefte’:  Heidegger Jahrbuch 10 (Freiburg:  Karl Alber, Nov. 2017).L.-M. Miranda, Hamilton:  The Revolution! (Grand Central Publishing, 2016).