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General Education Core Curriculum Classes - Learning Objectives, Goals and Competencies

All instructors of Core Courses in Philosophy are required to collect Outcomes Assessment data each semester.  This data is generated by evaluating a selection of student essays based on a standardized rubric.

Philosophy 101

Student Learning OutcomeCore Competency
1. Explain five problems/issues of the history of Philosophy that have shaped contemporary thought.1. Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of art.
2. Define the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, etc.; follow the development of at least one of these sub-fields in the history of philosophy.2. Compare art forms, modes of thought and expression across a range of historical periods.
3. Analyze a philosophical argument: Identify the thesis that the author is trying to establish. Identify the premises and intermediate statements that allegedly entail the conclusion.3. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspective.
4. Evaluate a philosophical argument in terms of the rigor of its logic and the plausibility of its premises (i.e., in terms of validity and soundness). Develop and effectively present a counterargument, taking into account other perspectives that find expression in contemporary society/the history of philosophy.4. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate any or all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.

Philosophy 156

Student Learning OutcomeCore Competency
1. Critically assess arguments with an aim toward distinguishing what constitutes effective, persuasive, and reasonable rhetorical strategies from the unreasonable and/or unethical use of fallacies and other rhetorical devices. Competency No. 11. Analyze and evaluate oral and written communication in terms of situation, audience, purpose, aesthetics, and diverse points of view.
2. Demonstrate the ability to engage in well-reasoned discourse on a topic that is relevant to one’s social-political existence and avoids recourse to irrational and unethical rhetorical techniques. Competencies Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 62. Express a primary purpose in a compelling statement and order supporting points logically and convincingly.
3. Write a well-developed, coherent essay presenting an informed point of view on a philosophical question of contemporary relevance, with a clear thesis statement and a conclusion as well as correct diction, grammar, and style. Competencies Nos. 2, 4, and 53. Use effective rhetorical strategies to persuade, inform, and engage.
4. Respond to feedback from others with different points of view in articulately and persuasively defending a thesis of one’s own. Competencies Nos. 4 and 64. Employ writing and/or speaking processes such as planning, collaborating, organizing, composing, revising, and editing to create presentations using correct diction, syntax, grammar, and mechanics.
 5. Integrate research correctly and ethically from credible sources to support the primary purpose of a communication.
 6. Engage in reasoned civic discourse while recognizing the distinctions among opinions, facts, and inferences.

Philosophy 201

Student Learning OutcomeCore Competency
1. Explain five problems/issues of ancient philosophy that continue to have relevance for contemporary philosophy.1. Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of art.
2. Define the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, etc.; follow the development of at least one of these sub-fields in ancient philosophy.2. Compare art forms, modes of thought and expression across a range of historical periods.
3. Analyze a philosophical argument from an ancient philosophical text: Identify the thesis that the author is trying to establish. Identify the premises and intermediate statements that allegedly entail the conclusion.3. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspective.
4. Evaluate an argument of an ancient philosopher in terms of the rigor of its logic and the plausibility of its premises (i.e., in terms of validity and soundness). Develop and effectively present a counterargument, taking into account other perspectives that find expression in contemporary society or ancient philosophy.4. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate any or all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.

Philosophy 202

Student Learning OutcomeCore Competency
1. Explain five problems/issues of (early) modern philosophy that have helped shape contemporary philosophy.1. Analyze and critically interpret significant primary texts and/or works of art.
2. Define the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, etc.; follow the development of at least one of these sub-fields in early modern philosophy.2. Compare art forms, modes of thought and expression across a range of historical periods.
3. Analyze a philosophical argument from a modern philosophical text: Identify the thesis that the author is trying to establish. Identify the premises and intermediate statements that allegedly entail the conclusion.3. Recognize and articulate the diversity of human experience across a range of historical periods and/or cultural perspective.
4. Evaluate an argument of an early modern philosopher in terms of the rigor of its logic and the plausibility of its premises (i.e., in terms of validity and soundness). Develop and effectively present a counterargument, taking into account other perspectives that find expression in contemporary society or modern philosophy.4. Draw on historical and/or cultural perspectives to evaluate any or all of the following: contemporary problems/issues, contemporary modes of expression, and contemporary thought.