Learning Outcomes for the B.A.

 

Broad Program Learning Goals for the B.A. in Philosophy

Last Updated: 10 August 2022

Program Goal
1A. Knowledge of some of the main areas of philosophy, for example, ethics, metaphysics and epistemology, at the level appropriate to the degree.
2B. Knowledge of the history of philosophy, at the level appropriate to the degree.
3C. Competence in philosophical methods, at the level appropriate to the degree.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and Assessment Methods for the B.A. in Philosophy

 Last Updated: 10 August 2022

Student Learning OutcomeAssessment Method

A1. Students can explain a central problem in a main area of philosophy (for traditional majors, metaphysics, epistemology, or ethics; for pre-law majors, philosophy of law or social and political philosophy; for English-philosophy majors, the relationship between philosophical movements and literary masterpieces) at a level sufficient to initiate a constructive classroom discussion.

This outcome will be evaluated via essays written by declared Philosophy majors. The essays will be randomly selected from two upper level courses, each in an important area of philosophy. Student essays will be rated on a five point scale in relation to their mastery of this outcome (1=Unsatisfactory, 2=Below expectation, 3=Satisfactory, 4=Good, 5=Excellent).  We expect 75% of students toreceive (an average of) 3 or better.

B1. Students can explain a problem or debate in the history of philosophy, or explain the view of a historical philosopher, a level sufficient to initiate a constructive classroom discussion.

This outcome will be evaluated via essays written by declared Philosophy majors. The essays will be randomly selected from two upper level courses, each in an important area of philosophy. Student essays will be rated on a five point scale in relation to their mastery of this outcome (1=Unsatisfactory, 2=Below expectation, 3=Satisfactory, 4=Good, 5=Excellent).  We expect 75% of students to receive (an average of) 3 or better.

C1. Students can accurately represent a philosophical position and the argument for that position (the reasons offered in support of it), and critically engage the argument, at a level sufficient to contribute constructively to a classroom discussion.

This outcome will be evaluated via essays written by declared Philosophy majors. The essays will be randomly selected from two upper level courses, each in an important area of philosophy. Student essays will be rated on a four point scale in relation to their mastery of this outcome (1=Unacceptable, 2=Acceptable, 3=Good, 4=Excellent). We expect 80% of students to receive (an average of) 2 or better.