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The course information on this page is released and updated by the UNM Office of the Registrar.
    • Information about fall and summer courses is typically released in early April.
    • Information about spring courses is typically released in early November.
After course data is released and visible below, it will get updated once a day, typically between 1am and 4am.
    • For real-time registration information, use the Search for Classes option at schedule.unm.edu.
    • For information about registration dates and deadlines, use the Registration Information link on the top left of schedule.unm.edu.

The course descriptions below are taken from the UNM Catalog. For instructor-provided course descriptions, visit Philosophy Courses @ UNM.


Be sure to toggle between Face-to-Face and Online to see our full line-up of classes.

Fall 2024

In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00364041Full

TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Dane Smith Hall227

Lecture
Kim345
00472658Full

MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall324

Lecture
Staff 346
00577830Full

MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Lecture
Swick336
00672659Full

TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Mitchell Hall102

Lecture
Candelaria346
00977435Full

TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lecture
Patwary344
01065700Full

MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Web Enhanced - Lecture
Garrido Sierralta348

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00270580Full

TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
George Pearl HallP104

Lecture
Hinton326
00364050Full

MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall123

Lecture
Seiler336
00464051Full

MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Dane Smith Hall325

Lecture
Staff 337
00664053Full

TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Economics1002

Lecture
Smith335
00977436Full

TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM

Lecture
Harrison320
01077437Full

MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Lecture
Staff 329

This course is an introductory survey of early modern Western philosophy. Through an in-depth reading of primary source material, this course will examine the traditions of Rationalism and Empiricism that emerged during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Concepts to be discussed might include theories of knowledge and metaphysics, early modern scientific thought, and theories of the self. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00164060Full

MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

Lecture
Staff 331

This course is an introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy. The course will include discussion of such philosophers as the Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Topics to be discussed may include the beginnings of scientific thought, theories of the self, the concept of being, virtue ethics, happiness, and theories of justice.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00164061Full

TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Lecture
Livingston325

An introductory survey of early and classical Greek philosophy, literature, and history. Figures: Presocratics, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle; Homer and Sophocles; Herodotus and Thucydides. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00172663Full

MWF12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Lecture
Harter3 Section Full
00277460Full

TR11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Lecture
Oberst322

This course traces the evolution of such topics as karma and rebirth and the nature of the liberated mind as discussed in the Buddhist traditions of India, Tibet, East Asia, and the modern West.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00177462Full

TR9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Lecture
McRae37

Upanishads, Bhagavad-gita, Jainism, Buddhism, the six Hindu systems and recent developments.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00177463Full

MWF9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

Lecture
Harter3 Section Full

A survey of main themes in Dilthey, Husserl, Scheler, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Hermeneutics, Structuralism, Deconstruction and the Frankfurt School. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00169470Full

TR12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Bandelier Hall East105

Lecture
Thomson316

An examination of the nature and possibility of knowledge. Topics include skepticism, the analysis of knowledge, and the nature and structure of epistemic justification. Prerequisite: 2210.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00277668Full

MWF10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Lecture
Staff 323

(Also offered as MATH **356) This is a first course in logical theory. Its primary goal is to study the notion of logical entailment and related concepts, such as consistency and contingency. Formal systems are developed to analyze these notions rigorously.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00277821Full

TR2:00 PM - 3:40 PM

Lecture
Becker424

Inquiry concerning goodness, rightness, obligation, justice and freedom. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00172662Full

MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Lecture
Kalar329

From Hobbes to present. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00177509Full

MWF11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Lecture
Johnston318

Examination of philosophical issues pertaining to law, including the nature of law, responsibility, rights, justice, the justification of punishment, and the justification of state interference with individual liberty. Pre-requisite: any course in Philosophy.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00165702Full

TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Mitchell Hall120

Lecture
Thomas315

A study of Kant’s philosophical thought that typically focuses on a close reading of significant portions of the Critique of Pure Reason. Topics may include: a priori knowledge, causality, and idealism. Prerequisite: 2210.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00177512Full

M4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Web Enhanced - Lecture
Domski34

Course emphasizes investigation, evaluation, and discussion of areas of specialized knowledge or inquiry relevant to the profession or field of study. Figure varies. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Sartre and Camus
00177510Full

TR2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Seminar
Oberst320
Badiou and Deleuze
00277519Full

T4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Seminar
Livingston36

This course offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students exposure to contemporary literature and current professional discussion on issues in metaphysics and/or epistemology. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Conceptual Engineering
00177521Full

W1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Seminar
Becker38

A close and critical examination of issues in the history of philosophy. Emphasis may be placed on a particular philosophical figure or on the development of a particular trend in the history of philosophy. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Marxs Grundrisse
00177818Full

W4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Seminar
Johnston33

This seminar offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students an in-depth engagement with a specific philosopher or philosophical orientation situated in the context of twentieth-century Europe. It focuses on French and/or German philosophies in particular. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
French Phenomenology
00177524Full

M1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Seminar
Kalar38

A close reading of a leading figure in contemporary continental philosophy, typically focusing on that thinker's most influential work, such as Sartre's Being and Nothingness, Levinas's Totality and Infinity, Gadamer's Truth and Method, etc. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Later Heidegger
00177523Full

R4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Recitation
Thomson31

For departmental honors in philosophy. {Offered upon demand}

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00112123FullSeminarHarter325
00212130FullSeminar Staff 325
00312136FullSeminarTaber325
00412141FullSeminarBecker325
00512189FullSeminarMurphy325
00612191FullSeminarJohnston324
00712193FullSeminarThomson325
00812195FullSeminarKalar325
00912197FullSeminar Staff 325
01112611FullSeminarDomski325
01334527FullSeminarLivingston325
01456070Full


Seminar
McRae325

A faculty-supervised course culminating in a comprehensive paper or research proposal that integrates knowledge attained through coursework, research, and experience.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00112614FullLectureMurphy1 TO 325
00212626FullLectureDomski1 TO 325
00312628FullLectureTaber1 TO 325
00412629FullLectureHarter1 TO 325
00512648FullLectureBecker1 TO 325
00834528FullLectureLivingston1 TO 325
01012632FullLecture Staff 1 TO 325
01112633FullLectureJohnston1 TO 325
01212635FullLectureThomson1 TO 325
01312637FullLectureKalar1 TO 325
01412638FullLecture Staff 1 TO 325
01712642FullLectureMcRae1 TO 325
01812643FullLectureGerber1 TO 325

For departmental honors. {Offered upon demand}

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00112650Full


Independent Study
Staff 325
00212651Full


Independent Study
Livingston324
00312653Full


Independent Study
Taber325
00412654Full


Independent Study
Harter325
00512655Full


Independent Study
Becker325
00612677Full


Independent Study
Domski325
00756071Full


Independent Study
McRae325
01012678Full


Independent Study
Murphy325
01112679Full


Independent Study
Johnston325
01212680Full


Independent Study
Thomson325
01312682Full


Independent Study
Kalar325
01412683Full


Independent Study
Staff 325

A study of Kant’s philosophical thought that typically focuses on a close reading of significant portions of the Critique of Pure Reason. Topics may include: a priori knowledge, causality, and idealism.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00177513Full

M4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Web Enhanced - Lecture
Domski36

Course emphasizes investigation, evaluation, and discussion of areas of specialized knowledge or inquiry relevant to the profession or field of study.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Badiou and Deleuze
00277520Full

T4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Recitation
Livingston310

Individual research into an area proposed by the student and conducted under the direction of a faculty member.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00115902FullIndependent StudyThomson1 TO 325
00215906FullIndependent StudyDomski1 TO 325
00315908FullIndependent StudyTaber1 TO 325
00415910FullIndependent StudyHarter1 TO 325
00515914FullIndependent StudyBecker1 TO 325
00756073Full


Independent Study
McRae1 TO 325
01015915FullIndependent StudyMurphy1 TO 325
01115917FullIndependent StudyJohnston1 TO 325
01215918FullIndependent Study Staff 1 TO 325
01315939FullIndependent StudyKalar1 TO 325
01415942FullIndependent Study Staff 1 TO 325
01715951FullIndependent StudyLivingston1 TO 325
01915962Full


Independent Study
Oberst1 TO 325

This course offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students exposure to contemporary literature and current professional discussion on issues in metaphysics and/or epistemology. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Conceptual Engineering
00177522Full

W1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Seminar
Becker312

A close and critical examination of issues in the history of philosophy. Emphasis may be placed on a particular philosophical figure or on the development of a particular trend in the history of philosophy. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Marxs Grundrisse
00177820Full

W4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Seminar
Johnston38

This seminar offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students an in-depth engagement with a specific philosopher or philosophical orientation situated in the context of twentieth-century Europe. It focuses on French and/or German philosophies in particular. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
French Phenomenology
00177526Full

M1:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Seminar
Kalar313

A close reading of a leading figure in contemporary continental philosophy, typically focusing on that thinker's most influential work, such as Sartre's Being and Nothingness, Levinas's Totality and Infinity, Gadamer's Truth and Method, etc. Prerequisite: 12 credit hours Philosophy course work.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
Sem: Later Heidegger
00165697Full

R4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Seminar
Thomson36

Faculty-supervised investigative study that results in the development and writing of a master’s thesis. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00116062FullThesisDomski1 TO 625
00316065FullThesisTaber1 TO 625
00416068FullThesisHarter1 TO 625
00516076FullThesisBecker1 TO 625
00756087Full


Thesis
McRae1 TO 625
00916087FullThesis Staff 1 TO 625
01016090FullThesisMurphy1 TO 625
01116094FullThesisJohnston1 TO 625
01216096FullThesisThomson1 TO 625
01316103FullThesisKalar1 TO 625
01416106FullThesis Staff 1 TO 625
01634078FullThesisLivingston1 TO 625

Individual research into an area proposed by the student and conducted under the direction of a faculty member. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00116120FullIndependent Study Staff 1 TO 325
00216125FullIndependent StudyDomski1 TO 325
00316128FullIndependent StudyTaber1 TO 325
00416130FullIndependent StudyHarter1 TO 325
00516135FullIndependent StudyBecker1 TO 325
00634079FullIndependent StudyLivingston1 TO 325
00756088Full


Independent Study
McRae1 TO 325
01016143FullIndependent StudyMurphy1 TO 324
01116145FullIndependent StudyJohnston1 TO 325
01216146FullIndependent StudyThomson1 TO 325
01316147FullIndependent StudyKalar1 TO 325
01416151FullIndependent Study Staff 1 TO 325

Faculty-supervised investigative study that results in the development and writing of a doctoral dissertation. Offered on a CR/NC basis only.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00116190FullDissertationDomski3 TO 1225
00316195FullDissertationTaber3 TO 1225
00416197FullDissertationHarter3 TO 1225
00516201FullDissertationBecker3 TO 1225
00634080FullDissertationLivingston3 TO 1225
00756089Full


Dissertation
McRae3 TO 1225
01016204FullDissertationMurphy3 TO 1225
01116208FullDissertationJohnston3 TO 1225
01216210FullDissertationThomson3 TO 1225
01316212FullDissertationKalar3 TO 1225
01416215FullDissertation Staff 3 TO 1225

Fall 2024-Online

In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 5: Humanities.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
001719031st Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Accelerated Online Programs - Lecture
Thomas38
002640471st Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Thomas37
007751542nd Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Accelerated Online Programs - Lecture
Thomas38
008780762nd Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Thomas35

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts. Meets New Mexico General Education Curriculum Area 1: Communication.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
007751582nd Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Gatsch3 Section Full
Waitlist: 16
00864056Full

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Ben Itzhak3 Section Full
Waitlist: 22

This course focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in the context of professional life. Beginning with an overview of several major ethical theories, the course will consider how these theories, which traditionally concern personal morality, apply to life in a professional setting. The course will focus on issues that might include lying and truth-telling, whistleblowing, confidentiality, the obligations of businesses toward the public, and the ethical concerns of privacy in journalism. Using a combination of readings, case studies, and discussion, students will explore these issues by critically evaluating ethical principles and also applying them to real-world settings.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
00178087Full

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Gatsch325

This course is a survey of the main epistemological, ontological and conceptual issues that arise from or concern the methodology and content of the empirical sciences.

Sections
#CRNTermTime/LocationInstructorCreditsSeats Available
CANCELLED
001
78088FullOnline - Lecture Staff 335
002790081st Half

Online MAXUNM CANVAS

Online - Lecture
Gatsch36